Matt Hasselbeck cut, Tennessee Titans

Matt Hasselbeck cut, The Titans released veteran quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, a move buying the team more cap space after they couldn’t work out an agreement to trim his $5.5 million salary for 2013.

The team moved quickly to replace Hasselbeck, signing ex-Bills QB Ryan Fitzpatrick to a two-year deal.

Hasselbeck, 37, spent the past two seasons with Tennessee, leading the Titans to a 9-7 record and just missing the playoffs on a tiebreaker in 2011 in coach Mike Munchak’s debut season coming off the NFL lockout.

But the Titans used the No. 8 draft selection overall in 2011 on Jake Locker, and they named him their starter for 2012. Hasselbeck, a former standout at Xaverian and Boston College who led the Seahawks to an appearance in Super Bowl XL, was due to count $7.5 million against the salary cap made him too pricey to keep.

According to USA Today, Hasselbeck won’t be unemployed long. The paper is reporting Hasselbeck is close to signing with the Colts to back up Andrew Luck.

Settlement reached

The NFL has agreed to pay $42 million as part of a settlement with a group of retired players who challenged the league over using their names and images without their consent. The league will use the money to fund a ‘‘common good’’ trust over the next eight years that will help retired players with an array of issues including medical expenses, housing, and career transition . . . The Atlanta City Council voted to approve a financing plan to build a new stadium for the NFL’s Falcons, removing one of the last hurdles for the downtown project that will replace the 20-year-old Georgia Dome.

Bengals ink Maualuga

The Bengals signed middle linebacker Rey Maualuga to a new contract — reportedly for two years and $6.5 million — another move to keep the league’s sixth-ranked defense virtually intact . . . The Steelers signed free agent tight end Matt Spaeth, who spent his first four seasons in Pittsburgh before signing with the Bears. No terms were available . . . The Vikings finalized a three-year deal worth up to $7.5 million with Pro Bowl fullback Jerome Felton. He will receive a $2 million signing bonus . . . The Rams and free agent offensive tackle Jake Long agreed to terms on a deal late Sunday night. Long, the first overall pick of the 2008 draft by the Dolphins, spent a few days in St. Louis last week and passed a physical, but left without a deal. Kevin Demoff, the Rams’ chief operating officer, confirmed the signing, which, according to ESPN, is for four years and up to $36 million . . . The Jets signed linebacker Antwan Barnes to a three-year contract and long snapper Tanner Purdum to a two-year pact . . . The Cowboys re-signed linebacker Ernie Sims to a one-year deal worth a reported $715,000.

Lisa Rinna lip trouble, Reveals Lisa

Lisa Rinna lip trouble, Lisa and the lip trouble seem to go hand in hand. People pretty much associate Rinna with her over-sized lips, even though she recently had them reduced. On March 18, Rinna filled in for Kathie Lee Gifford on "Today," and she told Hoda Kotb -- and the rest of the watching country -- the real story behind her huge lips.
Lisa Rinna

Lisa Rinna's lip trouble has since subsided, even though her lips are still puffy. She is on the current season of "Celebrity Apprentice: All-Stars" and Donald Trump has commented on how good Rinna looks -- especially her lips. They definitely seem better and if Rinna is more comfortable with them, then that's all that really matters. As far as Rinna feeling as though she made a mistake getting her lips filled, that's not the case at all. In fact, she thinks that she owes a lot to her pout.

"I would do it again. I never had a career before i had the lips so my lips have had their own career," Rinna told Kotb.

Lisa Rinna's lip trouble seems to be under control now. Do you think she looks good?

Jason Molina dies

Jason Molina dies, Alternative singer-songwriter Jason Molina has died at his home in Indianapolis. He was 39.

The Marion County coroner confirms Molina died Saturday. The cause of death hasn’t been determined.

His record label, Indiana-based Secretly Canadian, says he stopped touring in 2009 “to deal with severe alcoholism.”

On its website Monday, the label says the Lorain, Ohio, native released more than 12 albums under the name “Songs: Ohia” and the band Magnolia Electric Co., which he started in 2003. The label says Molina was its “cornerstone.”

A message attributed to his family and posted on the label’s website in September 2011 says he’d been in and out of rehabilitation facilities and hospitals in England and the U.S. over the previous two years and was raising goats and chickens in West Virginia.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Jason Molina dies, at the Age 39

Jason Molina dies, Molina Ohio-born indie rock singer and songwriter of the bands Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co. died Saturday at age 39 after a long battle with alcoholism, his record label announced.

“Jason is the cornerstone of Secretly Canadian,” read a statement issued Monday by the Bloomington, Ind.,-based label. “Without him there would be no us -- plain and simple. His singular, stirring body of work is the foundation upon which all else has been constructed. After hearing and falling in love with the mysterious voice on his debut single "Soul" in early 1996, we approached him about releasing a single on our newly formed label. For some reason he said yes.”
Jason Molina
Jason Molina of indie bands Songs: Ohia and Magnetic Electric Co. died March 16 at age 39. (Steve Gullick)
Early recordings by Molina were released under the name Songs: Ohia, and then he switched to the name Magnolia Electric Co. after his album of the same name in 2003.

PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013

The label’s statement, which attributed his death to natural causes, noted that starting in 1997, “He toured the world every year until he had to stop in 2009 to deal with severe alcoholism. Jason was incredibly humbled by his fans' support through the years and said that the two most important words he could ever say are ‘Thank you.’ ”

Here's Molina singing "Farewell Transmission" from the "Magnetic Electric Co." album, which was produced by Steve Albini.

$22 minimum wage

$22 minimum wage, Oh, the minimum wage simple and friendly-sounding yet actually regressive and economy-damaging populist throwback that just refuses to die. President Obama once again resurrected the timelessly terrible idea in his State of the Union speech in February, and it’s been percolating among the Democrats as a potential 2014-oriented rallying cry for how those obstructionist Republicans must really, really hate poor people because there’s no other possible explanation for their opposition (except that, you know, minimum wage hikes are actually counterproductive to an inclusive and prospering economy, but let’s just rid ourselves of any lingering school-girl notions that facts are what matter here, shall we?).

Last week in a hearing of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, Sen. Elizabeth Warren wondered, “If we started in 1960, and we said that, as productivity goes up — that is, as workers are producing more — then the minimum wage is going to go up the same. And, if that were the case, the minimum wage today would be about $22 an hour. So, my question, Mr. Dube, is what happened to the other $14.75?” National Review picked up on it:

Oof. Last month, HuffPo pointed out a 2012 ‘study’ that concluded pretty much the same thing:

President Obama’s call to increase the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour was one of the more significant proposals he laid out in his State of the Union address Tuesday night. But $9 an hour is still a far cry from what workers really deserve, a 2012 study finds.

The minimum wage should have reached $21.72 an hour in 2012 if it kept up with increases in worker productivity, according to a March study by the Center for Economic and Policy Research. While advancements in technology have increased the amount of goods and services that can be produced in a set amount of time, wages have remained relatively flat, the study points out. …

Between the end of World War II and the late 1960s, productivity and wages grew steadily. Since the minimum wage peaked in 1968, increases in productivity have outpaced the minimum wage growth.

I’m calling shenanigans. That is one wildly flawed premise, because the value of productivity is not a constant. As HuffPo’s writeup cedes, “advancements in technology have increased the amount of goods and services that can be produced in a set amount of time,” not to mention with fewer resources and at a lower cost — should in the increase in crop yield from a farmer using a donkey and plow versus a farmer using a tractor be directly proportional to an increase in those crops’ market worth because of some sort of imagined moral law about productivity and wages? No, because the market value of those crops has diminished as the ease of production has increased, and if that was the way the world worked, we’d all be paying a heck of a lot more for food right now.

Again, raising the minimum wage to some arbitrarily-determined level of ostensible just deserts is just another way of throwing market signals under the bus in exchange for more top-down control, which might benefit a few in the short run, but bogs down the entire economy in the long run. As Christina Romer, former head of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, put it:


Raising the minimum wage, as President Obama proposed in his State of the Union address, tends to be more popular with the general public than with economists. …

First, what’s the argument for having a minimum wage at all? Many of my students assume that government protection is the only thing ensuring decent wages for most American workers. But basic economics shows that competition between employers for workers can be very effective at preventing businesses from misbehaving. If every other store in town is paying workers $9 an hour, one offering $8 will find it hard to hire anyone — perhaps not when unemployment is high, but certainly in normal times. Robust competition is a powerful force helping to ensure that workers are paid what they contribute to their employers’ bottom lines.

$22 minimum wage, to Keep up Productivity

$22 minimum wage, Elizabeth Warren has made a case for increasing the minimum wage last week during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing, in which she cited a study that suggested the federal minimum wage would have stood at nearly $22 an hour today if it had kept up with increased rates in worker productivity.

"If we started in 1960 and we said that as productivity goes up, that is as workers are producing more, then the minimum wage is going to go up the same. And if that were the case then the minimum wage today would be about $22 an hour," she said, speaking to Dr. Arindrajit Dube, a University of Massachusetts Amherst professor who has studied the economic impacts of minimum wage. "So my question is Mr. Dube, with a minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, what happened to the other $14.75? It sure didn't go to the worker."

Dube went on to note that if minimum wage incomes had grown over that period at the same pace as it had for the top 1 percent of income earners, the minimum wage would actually be closer to $33 an hour than the current $7.25.

It didn't appear that Warren was actually trying to make the case for a $22 an hour minimum wage, but rather highlighting the results of a recent study that showed flat minimum wage growth over the past 40-plus years coinciding with surging inequality across a number of economic indicators.

Warren went on to argue that raising the federal minimum wage to over $10 an hour in incremental steps over the next two years -- a cause championed by President Barack Obama in his State of the Union address and since taken up in the Senate -- would not be as damaging for businesses as some critics have argued.

Bill O'Reilly divorce, wants his ex-wife to go to Hell

Bill O'Reilly divorce, Bill wants his ex-wife to go to Hell. Literally. As we previously reported, the Fox News falafelist became separated from his former wife Maureen McPhilmy at some point in 2011, and later went on an apparently corrupt crusade to destroy the career of the Nassau County Police detective she was dating. We have now confirmed that O'Reilly and McPhilmy have been formally divorced, that she has since married the detective, and that O'Reilly is in the midst of a scorched-earth custody battle—dubbed, appropriately enough, Anonymous v. Anonymous—over the ex-couple's two children. It involves a surreptitious attempt by O'Reilly to undermine his custody arrangement by hiring, as a member of his household staff, the woman he and his ex had agreed on as a neutral arbiter of their disputes. It also involves O'Reilly's attempts to annul his marriage and have McPhilmy potentially booted from the Catholic Church.

To catch you up: In May 2010, O'Reilly and his wife began living in separate houses less than half a mile from each other on Long Island. In 2011, O'Reilly used his connections with the Nassau County Police Department (and the potential for donations to a nonprofit affiliated with the department) to try to launch an internal affairs investigation into McPhilmy's new boyfriend—a Nassau County detective—for the crime of sleeping with Bill O'Reilly's wife. With the help of the New York Civil Liberties Union, we are currently suing the NCPD for access to public records, including O'Reilly's correspondence with former commissioner Lawrence Mulvey, about the episode. That case is on appeal to the Second Department of New York Supreme Court's Appellate Division.

Which brings us to another case we found rattling around in the Second Department: Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2. Family law cases in New York are not a matter of public record. But their existence, in the form of a docket entry with the names of the participants—as in Kramer v. Kramer—generally is. In rare cases, a judge will grant a motion to anonymize the names to protect the interests of the children or the privacy of public citizens. Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2 is one of those cases.

The dispute behind Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2 has been bitter enough, though, that the case ended up in the appellate division, where decisions are routinely published, often laying bare sensitive details. It's a custody action, commenced in September 2011, and you can read all about it right here, on the web site of the New York state court system. It involves a treacherous father who attempted to maintain control over the children he shared with his ex-wife by buying off and co-opting their purportedly neutral therapist. Anonymous 2011-1 is McPhilmy. Anonymous 2011-2 is O'Reilly.

The dispute was heard by the Second Department in January, after a trial court denied McPhilmy's motion to amend the couple's custody agreement.

Here's what the Second Department opinion reveals:
O'Reilly and McPhilmy separated on April 2, 2010.
They divorced on September 1, 2011.
They agreed to share custody of their two children, aged 13 and 10.
The couple's separation agreement included provisions allowing for shared custody—they each got the children on alternating weeks. And it also appointed a "neutral therapist" to, according to the opinion, "act as a neutral mediator to help them resolve any parenting disputes."

And here's where it gets interesting. In October 2011, McPhilmy took O'Reilly to court after learning that the woman she thought had been a neutral therapist serving the needs of her children was in fact a member of her ex-husband's household staff. The therapist, a Long Island licensed social worker named Lynne Kulakowski, was working long days and some evenings in O'Reilly's house, on his payroll, and basically acting as the children's nanny. From the opinion:


The mother claimed that the [father] had repeatedly violated conditions of the agreement. The mother further alleged that, after the execution of the agreement, the father had hired the children's therapist as a full-time employee to perform virtually all of his parental duties.... The mother's affidavit contained specific allegations concerning the father's repeated violations of the custody provisions of the agreement since its inception.... Moreover, the full-time employment of the children's therapist, the person designated in the agreement as a neutral third-party "arbitrator" of custodial disputes, by the father, constitutes a significant change of circumstance which could undermine the integrity of the agreement's custodial provisions.

At a Second Department hearing in January, McPhilmy's attorney claimed—and O'Reilly's attorney did not dispute—that Kulakowski was earning a six-figure salary from O'Reilly. All of this, of course, made a mockery of the custody agreement's appointment of Kulakowski as a neutral arbiter of disputes—O'Reilly rigged the game against his ex-wife. A lower court initially denied McPhilmy's request for a hearing about O'Reilly's co-optation of the therapist, but the appellate court agreed with McPhilmy and sent the case back for a hearing. In a highly unusual step for an appellate court, it also ordered the appointment of an independent attorney for the children, an indication that the dispute has become particularly poisonous.

Another indication that it has become poisonous: the Catholic Church has gotten involved. Gawker has learned that McPhilmy has been formally reprimanded in writing by her church for continuing to take communion in her Long Island parish despite having been divorced and remarried—a no-no according to the Pope. The reprimand also instructed her to stop telling her children that her second marriage, to the Nassau County detective O'Reilly tried to destroy, is valid in the eyes of God. It warned her that if she didn't comply, harsher measures may be in order.

Chad Glendinning, a professor of canon law at Canada's St. Paul University, couldn't say whether the reprimand was a first step on the road to excommunication. But he did say it appeared to be a first step toward barring her from the sacraments if necessary. "Public denial of holy communion is to be avoided as far as possible," he said. "Instead, pastors should take precautionary measures to explain the Church's teaching to concerned persons so that they may be able to understand it or at least respect it. It is possible that the letter you describe is such an attempt."

There presumably aren't too many people besides O'Reilly who know what McPhilmy is saying to her children about how God views her marriage. And O'Reilly, who interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan last year and donated more than $65,000 to New York Catholic parishes and schools in 2011, according to the tax return of his nonprofit foundation, carries considerable weight in the archdiocese.

While he's busy harassing McPhilmy for asserting the holiness of her second marriage, O'Reilly is trying to deny the existence of his first: He is, Gawker has learned, seeking an annulment of his 15-year marriage, which produced two children. Null and void. Invalid in the eyes of God. Never happened. This despite his manifest belief in the "stability" that straight marriage brings to the culture and concern at the (purportedly) declining marriage rates in countries that allow gay people to marry one another. If successful, the annulment would presumably render his 2004 escapade with former producer Andrea Mackris, whom he repeatedly and vividly sexually harassed with threats to take "the falafel thing...and put it on your pussy," retroactively kosher with Jesus. (It would also make him even more of an asshole than his familial nemesis Joseph Kennedy, who tried and failed to have his 12-year marriage annulled.)

The bow on this whole package is the matter of McPhilmy's attorney, listed atop the Second Department decision: She has hired a firm called Greenfield Labby, and is represented by one Casey Greenfield. Gawker readers will remember Greenfield as the daughter of network newsman Jeff Greenfield and babymama to CNN's Jeffrey Toobin, whom Greenfield had to sue for support in 2009 after the birth of their son. (Toobin was and remains married to another woman, and insisted for months that the child was not his; a paternity test proved otherwise.) Greenfield went on, according to the New York Times, to form a boutique divorce firm. She has apparently put her familiarity with TV assholes to good use.

We contacted Fox News, O'Reilly's attorney, Kulakowski, and Greenfield for comment; none did.

Bill O'Reilly divorce

Bill O'Reilly divorce, Bill wanted that his ex-wife to go to Hell. Literally. As we previously reported, the Fox News falafelist became separated from his former wife Maureen McPhilmy at some point in 2011, and later went on an apparently corrupt crusade to destroy the career of the Nassau County Police detective she was dating. We have now confirmed that O'Reilly and McPhilmy have been formally divorced, that she has since married the detective, and that O'Reilly is in the midst of a scorched-earth custody battle—dubbed, appropriately enough, Anonymous v. Anonymous—over the ex-couple's two children. It involves a surreptitious attempt by O'Reilly to undermine his custody arrangement by hiring, as a member of his household staff, the woman he and his ex had agreed on as a neutral arbiter of their disputes. It also involves O'Reilly's attempts to annul his marriage and have McPhilmy potentially booted from the Catholic Church.

To catch you up: In May 2010, O'Reilly and his wife began living in separate houses less than half a mile from each other on Long Island. In 2011, O'Reilly used his connections with the Nassau County Police Department (and the potential for donations to a nonprofit affiliated with the department) to try to launch an internal affairs investigation into McPhilmy's new boyfriend—a Nassau County detective—for the crime of sleeping with Bill O'Reilly's wife. With the help of the New York Civil Liberties Union, we are currently suing the NCPD for access to public records, including O'Reilly's correspondence with former commissioner Lawrence Mulvey, about the episode. That case is on appeal to the Second Department of New York Supreme Court's Appellate Division.

Which brings us to another case we found rattling around in the Second Department: Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2. Family law cases in New York are not a matter of public record. But their existence, in the form of a docket entry with the names of the participants—as in Kramer v. Kramer—generally is. In rare cases, a judge will grant a motion to anonymize the names to protect the interests of the children or the privacy of public citizens. Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2 is one of those cases.

The dispute behind Anonymous 2011-1 v. Anonymous 2011-2 has been bitter enough, though, that the case ended up in the appellate division, where decisions are routinely published, often laying bare sensitive details. It's a custody action, commenced in September 2011, and you can read all about it right here, on the web site of the New York state court system. It involves a treacherous father who attempted to maintain control over the children he shared with his ex-wife by buying off and co-opting their purportedly neutral therapist. Anonymous 2011-1 is McPhilmy. Anonymous 2011-2 is O'Reilly.

The dispute was heard by the Second Department in January, after a trial court denied McPhilmy's motion to amend the couple's custody agreement.

Here's what the Second Department opinion reveals:

O'Reilly and McPhilmy separated on April 2, 2010.
They divorced on September 1, 2011.
They agreed to share custody of their two children, aged 13 and 10.
The couple's separation agreement included provisions allowing for shared custody—they each got the children on alternating weeks. And it also appointed a "neutral therapist" to, according to the opinion, "act as a neutral mediator to help them resolve any parenting disputes."

And here's where it gets interesting. In October 2011, McPhilmy took O'Reilly to court after learning that the woman she thought had been a neutral therapist serving the needs of her children was in fact a member of her ex-husband's household staff. The therapist, a Long Island licensed social worker named Lynne Kulakowski, was working long days and some evenings in O'Reilly's house, on his payroll, and basically acting as the children's nanny. From the opinion:

The mother claimed that the [father] had repeatedly violated conditions of the agreement. The mother further alleged that, after the execution of the agreement, the father had hired the children's therapist as a full-time employee to perform virtually all of his parental duties.... The mother's affidavit contained specific allegations concerning the father's repeated violations of the custody provisions of the agreement since its inception.... Moreover, the full-time employment of the children's therapist, the person designated in the agreement as a neutral third-party "arbitrator" of custodial disputes, by the father, constitutes a significant change of circumstance which could undermine the integrity of the agreement's custodial provisions.

At a Second Department hearing in January, McPhilmy's attorney claimed—and O'Reilly's attorney did not dispute—that Kulakowski was earning a six-figure salary from O'Reilly. All of this, of course, made a mockery of the custody agreement's appointment of Kulakowski as a neutral arbiter of disputes—O'Reilly rigged the game against his ex-wife. A lower court initially denied McPhilmy's request for a hearing about O'Reilly's co-optation of the therapist, but the appellate court agreed with McPhilmy and sent the case back for a hearing. In a highly unusual step for an appellate court, it also ordered the appointment of an independent attorney for the children, an indication that the dispute has become particularly poisonous.

Another indication that it has become poisonous: the Catholic Church has gotten involved. Gawker has learned that McPhilmy has been formally reprimanded in writing by her church for continuing to take communion in her Long Island parish despite having been divorced and remarried—a no-no according to the Pope. The reprimand also instructed her to stop telling her children that her second marriage, to the Nassau County detective O'Reilly tried to destroy, is valid in the eyes of God. It warned her that if she didn't comply, harsher measures may be in order.

Chad Glendinning, a professor of canon law at Canada's St. Paul University, couldn't say whether the reprimand was a first step on the road to excommunication. But he did say it appeared to be a first step toward barring her from the sacraments if necessary. "Public denial of holy communion is to be avoided as far as possible," he said. "Instead, pastors should take precautionary measures to explain the Church's teaching to concerned persons so that they may be able to understand it or at least respect it. It is possible that the letter you describe is such an attempt."

There presumably aren't too many people besides O'Reilly who know what McPhilmy is saying to her children about how God views her marriage. And O'Reilly, who interviewed Timothy Cardinal Dolan last year and donated more than $65,000 to New York Catholic parishes and schools in 2011, according to the tax return of his nonprofit foundation, carries considerable weight in the archdiocese.

While he's busy harassing McPhilmy for asserting the holiness of her second marriage, O'Reilly is trying to deny the existence of his first: He is, Gawker has learned, seeking an annulment of his 15-year marriage, which produced two children. Null and void. Invalid in the eyes of God. Never happened. This despite his manifest belief in the "stability" that straight marriage brings to the culture and concern at the (purportedly) declining marriage rates in countries that allow gay people to marry one another. If successful, the annulment would presumably render his 2004 escapade with former producer Andrea Mackris, whom he repeatedly and vividly sexually harassed with threats to take "the falafel thing...and put it on your pussy," retroactively kosher with Jesus. (It would also make him even more of an asshole than his familial nemesis Joseph Kennedy, who tried and failed to have his 12-year marriage annulled.)

The bow on this whole package is the matter of McPhilmy's attorney, listed atop the Second Department decision: She has hired a firm called Greenfield Labby, and is represented by one Casey Greenfield. Gawker readers will remember Greenfield as the daughter of network newsman Jeff Greenfield and babymama to CNN's Jeffrey Toobin, whom Greenfield had to sue for support in 2009 after the birth of their son. (Toobin was and remains married to another woman, and insisted for months that the child was not his; a paternity test proved otherwise.) Greenfield went on, according to the New York Times, to form a boutique divorce firm. She has apparently put her familiarity with TV assholes to good use.

We contacted Fox News, O'Reilly's attorney, Kulakowski, and Greenfield for comment; none did.

Blake Shelton rumors

Blake Shelton rumors, Rumors that Blake Shelton is cheating on Miranda Lambert have been swirling for awhile now. On March 18, Yahoo posted saying that the two are laughing them off and can't wait to hear if they make it.

Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert are not taking these rumors serious at all. They know that their marriage is good. Plus if Blake is smart at all he knows Miranda has a mean side and she is the last woman that you would want to cheat on if you are married to her. Rumors are he was cheating with Cady Groves and you can learn more about her in this article.
View slideshow: Blake Shelton

The two were teasing back and forth on Twitter saying that they can't wait to see if they make it and Blake even said he is making her funnier. They like to tease these things on Twitter because they know that they simply are not true. Blake and Miranda are doing just fine. They aren't together as much as they would like while he is on "The Voice" but they are making it work.

Iran launches destroyer

Iran launches destroyer, Iran launched a domestically built destroyer in the Caspian Sea on Sunday, its first deployment of a major warship in the oil-rich region, state TV reported.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad inaugurated the guided missile destroyer Jamaran-2 in the port city of Anzali, about 150 miles northwest of Tehran.

He said the deployment aimed to bolster peace and friendship in the region. "The destroyer is there to meet those who want to jeopardize the security of surrounding nations," he said, without elaborating.

There are multiple disputes between the nations that surround the Caspian -- Iran, Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan -- on how the inland sea should be divided.

After final tests, the report said, Jamaran-2 will join Iran's naval fleet in the sea in coming months.

The 1,400-ton destroyer, which has a helicopter landing pad, is 94 meters (yards) long and can cruise at 30 knots. It is equipped with surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles as well as anti-aircraft batteries and sophisticated radar and communications terminals, the report said.

Iran launched a previous version of the Jamaran destroyer in 2010 in the Persian Gulf.

Since 1992, Iran has been building a self-sufficient military, reportedly producing its own jet fighters, tanks, missiles and light submarines as well as torpedoes.

Ahmadinejad said that the West has learned from Iran's technical expertise that the country's nuclear capabilities cannot be eliminated.

Both Israel and the United States have not ruled out military strikes against Iran's nuclear facilities. The West suspects Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons, a charge Iran denies.

QB Steve Davis dies

QB Steve Davis dies, Steve Davis started every game of Barry Switzer’s first three seasons as head coach at Oklahoma, piling up a 32-1-1 record with two national championships in a career that stood as the best in school history for more than three decades.

Davis’ school records for consecutive starts (34) and career victories (32) were surpassed only last season by Landry Jones, who started every game the past three seasons plus most of 2009.

In the process, Davis reached out to Jones, who had been criticized after an early season loss to Kansas State by writing him a letter; Davis had been booed during the only loss of his career, a 23-3 setback to Kansas in 1975. Jones would go on to break Davis’ career record for wins by beating Texas, also joining Davis, Jimmy Harris and Jamelle Holieway as the only Sooners’ quarterbacks to go 3-0 in Red River Rivalry starts.

“He just really wanted to encourage me,” Jones recalled. “Just keep going, keep leading those guys and keep fighting, regardless of what happens in the next game or the last game. Your focus is on this game and always to lead those guys.”

The 60-year-old Davis was one of two people killed Sunday when a small aircraft smashed into a house in South Bend, Ind. St. Joseph County Coroner Randy Magdalinski identified the victims Monday.

Davis was the Sooners’ starter from 1973 to 1975. Oklahoma tied Southern Cal in the second game of the 1973 season, then ran off 28 straight victories with Davis under center, Joe Washington in the backfield and the Selmon brothers anchoring the defense. The Sooners went 11-0 in 1974, then won the national title again the following year after going 11-1.

A product of a different era, Davis hardly had to throw a pass to be the star quarterback in Oklahoma’s dominant wishbone offense. He completed just 40 percent of his passes during his career for 2,034 yards, but only attempted about six passes per game during Oklahoma’s back-to-back championship seasons.

With silver-shoed All-American Washington carrying the ball, the Sooners rushed 813 times in 1974 — averaging an NCAA record 73.9 attempts per game — and amassing 438.8 yards on the ground.

Davis noted that his parents were from Sallisaw, but he was born at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, La., where his father was serving in the Air Force. He said he dreamed of playing for Oklahoma but was lightly recruited and, upon his father’s recommendation, considered attending West Point before joining the Sooners.

“When I got out of high school, I only knew two songs, ‘Boomer Sooner’ and ‘Amazing Grace,“’ Davis said in the 2012 book “I Love Oklahoma/I Hate Texas,” explaining how he became an ordained Baptist minister as a teenager.

Davis grew up in Sallisaw in far eastern Oklahoma and received the very last available scholarship to play at Oklahoma, only after another player had decided to play at Colorado instead, according to the book.

“They had a lot of scholarships and they recruited eight quarterbacks to try to find somebody that could imitate Jack Mildren, and I was one of those eight,” Davis recalled in the 2008 book “The Die-Hard Fan’s Guide to Sooner Football.” “I was the bottom of the eight but I was one of those eight, and through early fall drills I started out as number eight quarterback.”

Davis described how he considered leaving Oklahoma before the 1973 season, but instead dedicated himself to competing and ended up landing the starter’s job after Kerry Jackson was suspended and the Sooners were put on probation.

It would end up being among the greatest tenures for a starting quarterback in Oklahoma’s storied history, along with Harris’ performance during the NCAA record run of 47 consecutive victories.

“That’s what you live for,” Davis said in the “Fan’s Guide” interview. “I never felt nervous or anxious. I mean, I just couldn’t wait to get out there and go play, go match up, go see who’s better. I never got tight. I was an excitable player, but I think I played within myself, and just knowing I was going to go compete in front of 70,000 or 80,000 people and go find out who’s best — it was great.

“If you’re well prepared and you really have done your homework, there’s no reason to feel pressure.”

QB Steve Davis dies, When Aircraft Smashed

QB Steve Davis dies, former Oklahoma University starting quarterback was one of two people killed when a small aircraft smashed into a house in northern Indiana, officials said Monday.

St. Joseph County Coroner Randy Magdalinski identified the victims of Sunday's crash in South Bend as 60-year-old Steven Davis and 58-year-old Wesley Caves, both of Tulsa, Okla.

It was the same Davis who played quarterback for the Sooners in the 1970s, according to an Oklahoma athletics official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the school had not yet announced the death.

Caves owned the Beechcraft Premier I twin-jet that clipped two houses before slamming into a third home and screaming to a halt Sunday afternoon. Caves had a pilot's license, but it was not immediately clear if he was flying the plane when it crashed.

Davis went 32-1-1 as the Sooners' starter from 1973 to 1975, starting every game of Barry Switzer's first three seasons as head coach. Oklahoma tied Southern Cal in the second game of the 1973 season, then ran off 28 straight victories with Davis under center. The Sooners went 11-0 in 1974, then won the national title again the following year after going 11-1.

The plane leaked enough fuel in the crash to force the evacuation of hundreds of people from surrounding homes. The front part of the fuselage sat wedged inside the house just southwest of the South Bend Regional Airport where the pilot had tried to land the plane Sunday afternoon, minutes before the crash.

Two others on board the plane survived, South Bend Assistant Fire Chief John Corthier said. South Bend Memorial Hospital spokeswoman Maggie Scroope said Monday that Jim Rogers was in serious condition and Christopher Evans was in fair condition.

A woman who was injured on the ground, Diana McKeown, was in fair condition, Scroope said.

Authorities evacuated and cut the power to several homes in the neighborhood after fuel leaked from the jet's engine into the basement of the home creating a "very dangerous" situation, Corthier said. Everyone in the neighborhood has been accounted for, he said.

One neighbor described her terror as the plane bore down on her home.

"I was looking out my picture window," said Mary Jane Klaybor, who lives across the street from the crash site. "This (plane) was coming straight at my house. I went, 'Huh?' and then there was a big crash, and all the insulation went flying."

She said: "I saw the plane, then I heard the boom."

The plane began its journey in Tulsa, Okla. It is registered to 7700 Enterprises in Helena, Mont., which does business in Tulsa as DigiCut Systems and is owned by Caves.

Mike Daigle, executive director of the St. Joseph County Airport Authority, said the plane attempted a landing at the South Bend airport about 4:15 p.m., then went back up and maneuvered south to try another landing, but eight minutes later the airport learned the plane was no longer airborne.

He provided no information to indicate if the pilot said the plane was experiencing mechanical trouble. Daigle said Monday he has no firsthand knowledge about what caused the crash.

National Transportation Safety Board investigator Todd Fox arrived at the scene late Sunday. He said his agency will be looking for the cause of the crash and "to identify and remedy any issues that could have prevented this accident."

QB Steve Davis dies, of Air Crash

QB Steve Davis dies, A former University of Oklahoma starting quarterback was one of two people killed when a small aircraft smashed into a house in northern Indiana, officials said Monday.

St. Joseph County Coroner Randy Magdalinski identified the victims of Sunday's crash in South Bend as 60-year-old Steven Davis and 58-year-old Wesley Caves, both of Tulsa, Okla.

Steve Davis, left, stands with Oklahoma coach Barry Switzer and running back Billy Sims after after the Sooners beat Michigan in the 1976 Orange Bowl to win a national title
It was the same Davis who played quarterback for the Sooners in the 1970s, according to an Oklahoma athletics official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the school had not yet announced the death.

Caves owned the Beechcraft Premier I twin-jet that clipped two houses before slamming into a third home and screaming to a halt Sunday afternoon. Caves had a pilot's license, but it was not immediately clear if he was flying the plane when it crashed.

Davis went 32-1-1 as the Sooners' starter from 1973 to 1975, starting every game of Barry Switzer's first three seasons as head coach. Oklahoma tied Southern Cal in the second game of the 1973 season, then ran off 28 straight victories with Davis under center. The Sooners went 11-0 in 1974, then won the national title again the following year after going 11-1.

The plane leaked enough fuel in the crash to force the evacuation of hundreds of people from surrounding homes. The front part of the fuselage sat wedged inside the house just southwest of the South Bend Regional Airport where the pilot had tried to land the plane Sunday afternoon, minutes before the crash.

Two others on board the plane survived, South Bend Assistant Fire Chief John Corthier said. South Bend Memorial Hospital spokeswoman Maggie Scroope said Monday that Jim Rogers was in serious condition and Christopher Evans was in fair condition.

A woman who was injured on the ground, Diana McKeown, was in fair condition, Scroope said.

Authorities evacuated and cut the power to several homes in the neighborhood after fuel leaked from the jet's engine into the basement of the home creating a "very dangerous" situation, Corthier said. Everyone in the neighborhood has been accounted for, he said.

One neighbor described her terror as the plane bore down on her home.

"I was looking out my picture window," said Mary Jane Klaybor, who lives across the street from the crash site. "This (plane) was coming straight at my house. I went, 'Huh?' and then there was a big crash, and all the insulation went flying."

She said: "I saw the plane, then I heard the boom."

The plane began its journey in Tulsa, Okla. It is registered to 7700 Enterprises in Helena, Mont., which does business in Tulsa as DigiCut Systems and is owned by Caves.

Mike Daigle, executive director of the St. Joseph County Airport Authority, said the plane attempted a landing at the South Bend airport about 4:15 p.m., then went back up and maneuvered south to try another landing, but eight minutes later the airport learned the plane was no longer airborne.

He provided no information to indicate if the pilot said the plane was experiencing mechanical trouble. Daigle said Monday he has no firsthand knowledge about what caused the crash.

National Transportation Safety Board investigator Todd Fox arrived at the scene late Sunday. He said his agency will be looking for the cause of the crash and "to identify and remedy any issues that could have prevented this accident."

Cardinal: Pedophilia not crime

Cardinal: Pedophilia not crime, says cardinal on Monday apologized for offending victims of child abuse when he described pedophilia as an illness and not a crime in a media interview.

Victims' rights groups and others said the comments by Cardinal Wilfrid Fox Napier, the Catholic Archbishop of Durban, comments were insensitive, especially given perceptions the Catholic Church has not done enough to root out abuse.

"I apologize sincerely and unreservedly to all who were offended by the botched interview, and especially to those who have been abused and need every help and support that the Church can give," Napier said in a statement.

Napier, one of the 115 cardinals who took part in the Vatican conclave that elected Pope Francis, had told BBC Radio 5 that paedophilia was a "disorder" that needed to be treated.

RECOMMENDED: How much do you know about the Catholic Church? Take our quiz!

"From my experience, pedophilia is actually an illness. It's not a criminal condition, it's an illness," he had said.

He also told the BBC he knew of at least two priests who became paedophiles after they were abused as children and therefore required treatment, not punishment.

"That's when the wheels came off. I now stand accused of saying that pedophilia is a mental condition or disorder and not a crime," Napier said in his statement.

"Child sexual abuse is a heinous crime among other things because of the damage it does to the child. In that concern I include the abused who has become an abuser."

One prominent South African presenter, Justice Malala, named Napier "loser of the week" on his television show and said the Cardinal's remarks were an embarrassment to Catholics.

Francis, the first non-European pope in nearly 1,300 years, has signaled a sharp change of style from his predecessor, Benedict, for the 1.2-billion-member Church, which is beset by scandals, intrigue and strife.

He said on Saturday the church should be poor and remember that its mission is to serve the poor.

Ex-Oklahoma QB Killed in Plane Crash in Indiana

Ex-Oklahoma QB Killed, A former University of Oklahoma starting quarterback was one of two people killed when a small aircraft smashed into a house in northern Indiana, officials said Monday.

St. Joseph County Coroner Randy Magdalinski identified the victims of Sunday's crash in South Bend as 60-year-old Steven Davis and 58-year-old Wesley Caves, both of Tulsa, Okla.

It was the same Davis who played quarterback for the Sooners in the 1970s, according to an Oklahoma athletics official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the school had not yet announced the death.

Caves owned the Beechcraft Premier I twin-jet that clipped two houses before slamming into a third home and screaming to a halt Sunday afternoon. Caves had a pilot's license, but it was not immediately clear if he was flying the plane when it crashed.

Davis went 32-1-1 as the Sooners' starter from 1973 to 1975, starting every game of Barry Switzer's first three seasons as head coach. Oklahoma tied Southern Cal in the second game of the 1973 season, then ran off 28 straight victories with Davis under center. The Sooners went 11-0 in 1974, then won the national title again the following year after going 11-1.

The plane leaked enough fuel in the crash to force the evacuation of hundreds of people from surrounding homes. The front part of the fuselage sat wedged inside the house just southwest of the South Bend Regional Airport where the pilot had tried to land the plane Sunday afternoon, minutes before the crash.
The front end of a Hawker Beachcraft Premier jet sits in a room of a home on Iowa Street in South Bend, Ind., Sunday, March 17, 2013. Authorities say a private jet apparently experiencing mechanical trouble crashed resulting in injuries. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Roland Herwig says the Beechcraft Premier I twin-jet had left Tulsa, Okla.'s Riverside Airport and crashed near the South Bend Regional Airport on Sunday afternoon
Two others on board the plane survived, South Bend Assistant Fire Chief John Corthier said. South Bend Memorial Hospital spokeswoman Maggie Scroope said Monday that Jim Rogers was in serious condition and Christopher Evans was in fair condition.

A woman who was injured on the ground, Diana McKeown, was in fair condition, Scroope said.

Authorities evacuated and cut the power to several homes in the neighborhood after fuel leaked from the jet's engine into the basement of the home creating a "very dangerous" situation, Corthier said. Everyone in the neighborhood has been accounted for, he said.

One neighbor described her terror as the plane bore down on her home.

"I was looking out my picture window," said Mary Jane Klaybor, who lives across the street from the crash site. "This (plane) was coming straight at my house. I went, 'Huh?' and then there was a big crash, and all the insulation went flying."

She said: "I saw the plane, then I heard the boom."

The plane began its journey in Tulsa, Okla. It is registered to 7700 Enterprises in Helena, Mont., which does business in Tulsa as DigiCut Systems and is owned by Caves.

Mike Daigle, executive director of the St. Joseph County Airport Authority, said the plane attempted a landing at the South Bend airport about 4:15 p.m., then went back up and maneuvered south to try another landing, but eight minutes later the airport learned the plane was no longer airborne.

He provided no information to indicate if the pilot said the plane was experiencing mechanical trouble. Daigle said Monday he has no firsthand knowledge about what caused the crash.

National Transportation Safety Board investigator Todd Fox arrived at the scene late Sunday. He said his agency will be looking for the cause of the crash and "to identify and remedy any issues that could have prevented this accident."

Vanessa Marcil divorce

Vanessa Marcil divorce, Two years after swapping vows with CSI: NY actor Carmine Giovinazzo, Vanessa Marcil has pulled the plug on their union.


Vanessa Marcil and Carmine Giovinazzo on May 31, 2012 in Tel Aviv, Israel.
Filing divorce papers in Los Angeles County Superior Court, Marcil, 43, cited irreconcilable differences as the reason for her split from the actor, 38, according to TMZ. In her filing, Marcil petitions the court to order Giovinazzo to pay her attorney's fees and award her spousal support.

PHOTOS: Biggest celeb splits of 2012

Giovinazzao -- who wed the actress in July 2010 -- was Marcil's second husband. She was married to '80s star Corey Feldman from 1989-1993.
Vanessa Marcil and Brian Austin Green on October 24, 2000 in Beverly Hills, California.
Former Beverly Hills, 90210 actress Marcil dated her costar, Brian Austin Green, from 1999-2003. They share a son, Kassius, 10. Green married Megan Fox in June 2010. Green, 39, and Fox, 26, are expecting their first child together.

Vanessa Marcil divorce, 90210 Star is now Free

Vanessa Marcil divorce, Exclusive Former 90210 Star Vanessa Marcil is officially a free woman because her divorce from "CSI:NY" actor Carmine Giovinazzo (aka the nicest DUI arrestee of all time) has been finalized.
TMZ broke the story ... Marcil filed for divorce from Giovinazzo last summer, citing "irreconcilable differences." They were married in 2010 and have no children together.

As for the division of assets ... Vanessa gets the 2009 Chevy Silverado, their L.A. property, a bunch of bank accounts ... as well as all rights to her baby clothes company called Baby Gagoo.

Carmine gets the mother lode -- a 2002 Mercedes CLK, his 2006 Harley, his 2010 Triumph motorcycle, the 1969 Pontiac GTO, 2009 Ducati, 2011 Chevy Camaro ... plus a bunch of bank accounts and other boring stuff.

It's been a rough couple months for Carmine, who was arrested for DUI in January in Scottsdale, AZ. You'll recall, AZ cops say the actor was one of the nicest people they've ever arrested, apologizing constantly and saying he didn't want to be an "a**hole." He even thanked the arresting officers profusely for being so nice to him.

According to police, Carmine's blood alcohol level registered at .149 after his arrest ... nearly twice the legal limit in AZ.


He has since been ordered to complete an alcohol program ... but hey, at least the divorce is behind him.

Race car driver kills cousin

Race car driver kills cousin, Authorities have identified the victims of a California raceway crash as a race car owner and the 14-year-old cousin of the teenage driver.

The Yuba County Sheriff's office said the crash occurred at Marysville Raceway Park in Santa Rosa when the race car driven by Chase Johnson careened off the track and into the pit row, striking and killing 68-year-old Dale Wondergem Jr. and 14-year-old Marcus Johnson on Saturday.

Chase Johnson, 17, was not injured in the accident.

Wondergem owned one of the cars at the track but not the car involved in the accident. Steven Blakesley, the race announcer, said Chase Johnson was driving his car on the track at about 90 mph when it couldn't make a turn.

"There must have been a mechanical problem," Blakesley said. "The car didn't slow down."

The Sheriff's Department and California Highway Patrol are investigating to determine the cause of the crash.

Marathon runner dies, of Deadly Heart Attack

Marathon runner dies, The Former marathon runner had suffered Deadly heart attack and died during a Barcelona race, according to a March 17 report from the Associated Press via MSN. That sad situation is trending on Sunday.
Many races take place in Barcelona, the location of the marathon where a runner died on March 17
Many races take place in Barcelona, the location of the marathon where a runner died on March 17
The 47-year-old athlete passed away after the St Patrick's Day race. This happened while he was being attended to at Clinic Hospital located in the Spanish city. Since this news is just breaking, not much is known about the runner who died, but more information should become available soon and will be updated here.

By way of background, the Barcelona Marathon is one of the biggest events held in this lively European city. In fact, tens of thousands of fans lined the streets of the metropolis to watch as runners whizzed by.

Some course landmarks included Gaudi’s imposing La Pedrera as well as his celebrated Sagrada Familia. The UNESCO site called Hospital de Sant Pau was also spotted as these well rehearsed athletes sped past.

That said, the race began in front of the iconic Montjuïc in front of the Magic Fountain, and was a thrilling competition now marred by the death of a marathon runner who was one of more than 8,000 who participated. He apparently fell ill while others passed him, and all attempts were made to save his life but he passed away not long after he arrived at the medical facility where he was being treated.

Stay tuned for more about the marathon runner who died in Barcelona on Sunday during a fast-clipped run that took his life on March 17.

Phelps 2016 Olympics

Phelps 2016 Olympics, This past summer in London, Michael Phelps became the most decorated Olympian of all time, finishing with 22 career medals and universal acclaim for his achievements. So when he said he'd retired from Olympic competition after London, he didn't waver. Like Alexander the Great, he had no more worlds left to conquer.

Or so we assumed. Ryan Lochte, Phelps' heir apparent, believes Phelps might not be done after all. "The sport will miss him," Lochte said in advance of the World Short Course championships in Istanbul. "He is one of my favorite rivals, and I will miss him. But I think he will come back. When you do something for so long every day ... he's still young. I think he will be back for Rio. We'll see. He'll miss the sport.''



Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps. (Getty Images)
Perhaps yes, perhaps no. Phelps has insisted he wants to live a "normal" life, or what passes for one after spending four Olympics as one of the most recognizable athletes on the planet. But as Michael Jordan, Brett Favre and pretty much every boxer who ever fought can tell you, walking away from the cheers is no easy task.

Thing is, the pool waits for no one, not even Phelps. While he was impressive in London, he wasn't as dominant as he'd been in past years. And both motivation and ability for the relentless training necessary to beat the best wanes over time. Phelps has always insisted he was done, but as USA Today notes, he's six months younger than LeBron James. Granted, swimming and basketball require two different types of physical and mental dedication, but it's not out of the question for Phelps to take a shot at qualifying for Rio.

We shall wait and see. Anyone want to bet on his return?

Phelps 2016 Olympics, Will Win More

Phelps 2016 Olympics, Michael Phelps was down in Rio for the Laureus World Sports Awards on Monday, but reiterated the fact that he won’t be back for the Olympics in three years. At least not as a competitor.

“I am having fun. I love being retired, I can’t stress it enough,” Phelps said during a swimming event for children. “I am happy, smiling, and more relaxed. It’s something that I have wanted for a long time and now I’m happy that I can make the most of it.”


Phelps was also happy to praise Rio as it prepares to host the upcoming 2016 Olympics.

“It’s not something you see too often. It’s going to be something special for Rio to host the Olympics and the World Cup with this type of spirit.”

But while Phelps may be done with swimming, the world isn’t quite done giving him accolades: Phelps was honored with the first Laureus Exceptional Achievement Award after winning six medals in London last summer for a career total of 22, surpassing Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina for the most all-time.

“It has been an amazing career and it is crazy to think that it is over,” he said at the podium. “But I’ve done everything that I wanted to do in sport. I wanted to change swimming and take it to a level, and I have. But I will continue to be a part of sport and help grow sports. That is a goal and a passion of mine.”

Cardinal says Pedophilia Not a Crime

Cardinal says pedophilia not a crime, south african cardinal who helped elect Pope Francis this week has told the BBC pedophilia is an illness and not a crime.

Cardinal Wilfrid Fox Napier, the Catholic Archbishop of Durban, told BBC Radio 5 on Saturday that pedophilia was a "disorder" that needed to be treated.

"From my experience, pedophilia is actually an illness. It's not a criminal condition, it's an illness," he said.

Napier said he knew of at least two priests who became pedophiles after they were abused as children.

"Now don't tell me that those people are criminally responsible like somebody who chooses to do something like that. I don't think you can really take the position and say that person deserves to be punished. He was himself damaged."

The Catholic Church has had its image deeply tarnished by a widespread child sex abuse scandal.

Napier was one of the 115 cardinals in the Vatican conclave that elected Pope Francis on Wednesday, the BBC reported.

The first non-European pope in nearly 1,300 years, Francis has signaled a sharp change of style from his predecessor, Benedict, for the 1.2-billion-member Church, which is beset by scandals, intrigue and strife.

He said on Saturday the church should be poor and remember that its mission is to serve the poor.

Lohan Misses Flight

Lohan misses flight, Lindsay Lohan is tempting fate in court after she got off her NY-to-Los Angeles flight Saturday to stay in the Big Apple and party at a club, according to new online reports.

Lohan is scheduled to appear in an LA courtroom tomorrow to faces charges she lied to law enforcement officials following a crash last summer.

If Lohan doesn't appear, a bench warrant will be issued, law enforcement sources told TMZ.

The gossip site reported that LiLo was supposed to fly out around 9 p.m. yesterday and had even boarded the plane but instead stayed in Gotham to watch a band called City of the Sun.
Lindsay Lohan
The site says Lohan was in such a rush to leave because she thought the plane was unsafe that she left her bags behind.

The site says Linz is scrambling to find a flight out today that will get her to LA in time for tomorrow's hearing at 8:30 a.m. local time, including trying to get a private flight to the West Coast.

Lohan has missed other court dates in the past, including a time in 2010 where she said she lost her passport.

Lohan misses flight, Had to Appear in LA Court

Lohan misses flight, Lindsay Lohan's travel history is as sketchy as her driving history ... and her rehab history ... and her dating history ... and TMZ has learned she missed a flight to Los Angeles last night, with her court date looming Monday.

LiLo is scheduled to appear in court tomorrow to begin her trial for allegedly lying to cops last summer following her crash on PCH. Law enforcement sources tell TMZ that Lindsay MUST be there in person or else a bench warrant will be issued.

Sources close to Lindsay tell TMZ she had a flight scheduled from NY to LA yesterday at around 9:00 PM ET ... but skipped it. Instead, Lindsay was at a club in New York to see a band called City of the Sun.

We're told Lindsay is trying to schedule a flight for later today, but has yet to do so.

Lindsay's history of missing flights is rather prolific -- she missed a court date in 2010 after she claimed to lose her passport. Last April, Lindsay missed her flight to the White House Correspondents' Dinner after she "couldn't get herself together."

The hearing is expected to start at 8:30 AM PT and we'll have it for you live.

Will Lindsay be there? Stay tuned ...

UPDATE 3:30 PM PT -- According to our sources, Lindsay first booked a flight for 6:00 PM ET, but then decided to take a later flight with her mom Dina. As for whether or not she'll be on it, your guess is as good as ours.

Paltrow Miscarriage

Paltrow Miscarriage, Academy Award-winning actress Gwyneth Paltrow described what appears to have been a miscarriage of her third child and revealed more details about an unrelated health scare that brought on stroke-like symptoms.

Paltrow revealed her health issues to The Daily Mail’s Sunday magazine named You. Two articles about Paltrow appeared in You.

Paltrow, 40, is married to British songwriter Chris Martin, the lead singer for the rock band Coldplay. They have two children: Apple, 8, and Moses, 6.

“My children ask me to have a baby all the time. And you never know, I could squeeze one more in. I am missing my third. I’m thinking about it,” Paltrow told the magazine. “But I had a really bad experience when I was pregnant with my third. It didn’t work out and I nearly died. So I am like, ‘Are we good here or should we go back and try again?’”

Paltrow did not say when the miscarriage occurred.

“In some cases, a woman may have to decide how badly she wants to try [for more children], especially if her complications could potentially endanger her life,” said Dr. Jennifer Ashton, senior medical contributor for ABC News.

The actress went into greater detail about a 2011 health scare in which she said she “lost control of her right hand and suffered a blinding pain in her head that was so extreme she thought she was having a stroke.”

The incident occurred when Paltrow was in the garden of her home in North London. Paltrow said she underwent a series of tests that revealed she was “a mess.”

“I was vitamin-D deficient, I had (anemia), I had thyroid issues, my liver was congested, I had hormonal imbalances and a benign (tumor) on my ovary that had to be removed. I mean, it was crazy,” she told You. “I knew it was time for change.”

She adopted the elimination diet — a diet which focuses on avoiding foods that are thought to cause adverse effects. She said the diet inspired her latest cookbook, “It’s All Good: Delicious, Easy Recipes That Will Make You Look Good and Feel Great.”

Paltrow’s children also follow an unconventional diet: The actress reportedly feeds her children food that is low in carbohydrates.

Paltrow told You she wanted to ensure that her children’s lives were as normal as she could make them. She also said her husband is a good father.

“Regardless of what happens in our marriage, I chose the best father,” she said of Martin. “He is so good to the children, and to know that you had kids with such a good man is like a real weight off you. We are committed co-parents, we make all the decisions together and we lean on each other for support as well,” she said.

Paltrow has starred in several movies, including “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” “Contagion” and the “Iron Man” film franchise. She won the Academy Award in 1998 for best actress for her role in “Shakespeare in Love.”

Paltrow miscarriage, Gwyneth Lost her Third Child

Paltrow miscarriage, Gwyneth Paltrow opening up about heartbreaking time in her life.

In a candid interview with the Mail on Sunday’s You magazine today (March 17), the 40-year-old actress reveals that she experienced a miscarriage while pregnant with her third child.


Gwyneth Paltrow reveals devastating miscarriage in Mail on Sunday's You magazine on March 17.
Paltrow, who has two children -- daughter Apple, 8, and son Moses, 6, -- with husband Chris Martin, confesses that she "nearly died" after losing the baby.

"My children ask me to have a baby all the time. And you never know, I could squeeze one more in. I am missing my third. I’m thinking about it," Paltrow explains, continuing, "But I had a really bad experience when I was pregnant with my third. It didn’t work out and I nearly died. So I am like, 'Are we good here or should we go back and try again?'"

One thing is for certain -- new parents and Paltrow's pals Jay-Z and Beyonce have made her reconsider getting pregnant again. "Their baby Blue Ivy is totally delish," she gushes. "She’s made me very broody."

The "Iron Man 3" star has been honest about adding to her brood, recently confessing that she thought about having another child when her son Moses was younger.

"My brain says, 'Oh, I think I'm done, the kids are so big now, and I don't want to go back to changing diapers,'" she told the October issue of InStyle magazine. "But a part of me would love to have another. Of course, I'm old now!"

Still, no matter what Paltrow decides in the baby department, she knows she chose the best man to raise a family with.

"Regardless of what happens in our marriage, I chose the best father," she tells You magazine of Coldplay frontman Martin, 36. "He is so good to the children, and to know that you had kids with such a good man is like a real weight off you. We are committed co-parents, we make all the decisions together and we lean on each other for support as well."

Cheney eyed Iraq oil

Cheney eyed Iraq oil, Former Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force appeared to have some interest in early 2001 in Iraq's oil industry, including which foreign companies were pursuing business there, according to documents released Friday by a private watchdog group.

Judicial Watch, a conservative legal group, obtained a batch of task force-related Commerce Department papers that included a detailed map of Iraq's oil fields, terminals and pipelines as well as a list entitled "Foreign Suitors of Iraqi Oilfield Contracts."

The papers also included a detailed map of oil fields and pipelines in Saudi Arabia and in the United Arab Emirates and a list of oil and gas development projects in those two countries.

The papers were dated early March 2001, about two months before the Cheney energy task force completed and announced its report on the administration's energy needs and future energy agenda.

Judicial Watch obtained the papers as part of a lawsuit by it and the Sierra Club to open to the public information used by the task force in developing President Bush's energy plan.

Tom Fitton, the group's president, said he had no way to guess what interest the task force had in the information, but "it shows why it is important that we learn what was going on in the task force."

"Opponents of the war are going to point to the documents as evidence that oil was on the minds of the Bush administration in the run-up to the war in Iraq," said Fitton. "Supporters will say they were only evaluating oil reserves in the Mideast, and the likelihood of future oil production."

The task force report was released in May 2001. In it, a chapter titled "Strengthening Global Alliances" calls the Middle East "central to world oil security" and urges support for initiatives by the region's oil producers to open their energy sectors to foreign investment. The chapter does not mention Iraq, which has the world's second largest oil reserves after Saudi Arabia.

Commerce Department spokesman Trevor Francis said: "It is the responsibility of the Commerce Department to serve as a commercial liaison for U.S. companies doing business around the world, including those that develop and utilize energy resources. The Energy Task Force evaluated regions of the world that are vital to global energy supply. The final report, released in May of 2001, contains maps of key energy-producing regions in the world, including Russia, North America, the Middle East and the Caspian region."

A spokeswoman for the vice president did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment Friday.

A two-page document obtained with the map and released by Judicial Watch lists, as of March 2001, companies in 30 countries that had an interest in contracts to help then-President Saddam Hussein develop Iraq's oil wealth.

The involvement of Russia and France has been documented. Also on the list were companies from Canada, Australia, China, Germany, Indonesia, Ireland, India and Mexico. Even Vietnam had interest in a service contract and, according to the paper, was close to signing an agreement in October 1999.

So far nearly 40,000 pages of internal documents from various departments and agencies have been made public related to the Cheney task force's work under the Judicial Watch-Sierra Club lawsuit. The task force itself has refused to turn over any of its own papers.

Cheney Eyed Iraq Oil, Former Vice President

Cheney Eyed Iraq Oil, The Former Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force appeared to have some interest in early 2001 in Iraq's oil industry, including which foreign companies were pursuing business there, according to documents released Friday by a private watchdog group.

Judicial Watch, a conservative legal group, obtained a batch of task force-related Commerce Department papers that included a detailed map of Iraq's oil fields, terminals and pipelines as well as a list entitled "Foreign Suitors of Iraqi Oilfield Contracts."..........yuricareport.

The papers also included a detailed map of oil fields and pipelines in Saudi Arabia and in the United Arab Emirates and a list of oil and gas development projects in those two countries.

The papers were dated early March 2001, about two months before the Cheney energy task force completed and announced its report on the administration's energy needs and future energy agenda.

Judicial Watch obtained the papers as part of a lawsuit by it and the Sierra Club to open to the public information used by the task force in developing President Bush's energy plan.

Tom Fitton, the group's president, said he had no way to guess what interest the task force had in the information, but "it shows why it is important that we learn what was going on in the task force."

"Opponents of the war are going to point to the documents as evidence that oil was on the minds of the Bush administration in the run-up to the war in Iraq," said Fitton. "Supporters will say they were only evaluating oil reserves in the Mideast, and the likelihood of future oil production."

The task force report was released in May 2001. In it, a chapter titled "Strengthening Global Alliances" calls the Middle East "central to world oil security" and urges support for initiatives by the region's oil producers to open their energy sectors to foreign investment. The chapter does not mention Iraq, which has the world's second largest oil reserves after Saudi Arabia.

Commerce Department spokesman Trevor Francis said: "It is the responsibility of the Commerce Department to serve as a commercial liaison for U.S. companies doing business around the world, including those that develop and utilize energy resources. The Energy Task Force evaluated regions of the world that are vital to global energy supply. The final report, released in May of 2001, contains maps of key energy-producing regions in the world, including Russia, North America, the Middle East and the Caspian region."

A spokeswoman for the vice president did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment Friday.

A two-page document obtained with the map and released by Judicial Watch lists, as of March 2001, companies in 30 countries that had an interest in contracts to help then-President Saddam Hussein develop Iraq's oil wealth.

The involvement of Russia and France has been documented. Also on the list were companies from Canada, Australia, China, Germany, Indonesia, Ireland, India and Mexico. Even Vietnam had interest in a service contract and, according to the paper, was close to signing an agreement in October 1999.

So far nearly 40,000 pages of internal documents from various departments and agencies have been made public related to the Cheney task force's work under the Judicial Watch-Sierra Club lawsuit. The task force itself has refused to turn over any of its own papers.

David Hasselhoff

David Hasselhoff, David The Hoff Hasselhoff sings to save Berlin Wall David The Hoff Hasselhoff sings to save Berlin Wall Photo:

David "The Hoff" Hasselhoff joined a campaign in Germany to keep what remains of the Berlin Wall as a monument after local developers had originally planned to demolish parts of the former Cold War symbol.

Cheered on by thousands of mostly young protesters who want the Wall to stay how it is, Hasselhoff performed his former hit song "Looking for Freedom" from the back of a van, singing into a megaphone. Recalling the time when in 1989 he was asked to sing the song on theBerlin Wall, Hasselhoff told reporters:

    I was honoured in 1989 to sing on the Wall. It was a big surprise to me when they called and asked if I could sing on New Year's Eve and I said, only if I can sing on the Wall, knowing they would say no. And they said we need to get (then West German Chancellor) Helmut Kohl and (then East German leader Erich) Honecker to say yes. Both chancellors had to say yes.

    They called back two days later and they said yes.

He said the Wall, "keeps the memories of all the families, the thousands and thousands of families that were torn apart alive."

Some 6,000 people recently demonstrated to keep the part of the Berlin Wall known as "East Side Gallery" intact after German media reported that investors had planned the construction of a 120 metre high building which would have required the demolition of part of the monument.

According to more recent media reports, no demolition is currently planned.

David Hasselhoff, Star Power To New Campaign

David Hasselhoff put his name behind a campaign to preserve one of the few remaining sections of the Berlin Wall, calling it a "sacred" monument to cheers Sunday from Germans who fondly remember his schmaltzy hit "Looking for Freedom" as one of the soundtracks to their peaceful 1989 revolution.

The actor, best known for starring in "Knight Rider" and "Baywatch," joined ordinary Berliners in protesting a real estate developer's plans to move part of the wall to make way for an access path for a luxury housing development.

David Hasselhoff wants to stop plans to move a section of the Berlin Wall.

"It's like tearing down an Indian burial ground. It's a no-brainer," said Hasselhoff, before recounting his own memories of visiting East Germany – grim cities, grim food – shortly before unification.

Plans to move part of the East Side Gallery – a 1.3 kilometer (3/4 mile) stretch of wall painted by artists after the fall of communism and popular with tourists – sparked angry protests earlier this month. Activists have denounced it as part of a wider trend of steamrolling Berlin's tumultuous history to make way for gleaming but soulless developments in the heart of the city.

At least 136 people died between 1961 and 1989 trying to cross the wall that divided the communist-run East Berlin from West Berlin. Most of the wall has since been destroyed, with only two large sections remaining as memorials.

"It's a stupid idea to rip parts of the wall out for luxury apartments," said Roland Junge, one of thousands of locals who accompanied Hasselhoff on an impromptu walk along the wall Sunday.

"This last piece of the wall is really sacred," Hasselhoff told reporters. "It's about people and it's about hearts that were broken, hearts that were torn apart and lives that were lost. That's what we're talking about today, not a piece of real estate."

Asked if he thought his song – belted out by a million people on both sides of the wall during a New Year's Eve concert in 1989 – had played any role in bringing down the most visible section of the Iron Curtain, Hasselhoff said: "Whether it had anything to do with anything, it's a song about freedom and it stuck in their head because it had a good hook."

Berliners can prepare for a reprise if talks involving the developers, authorities and campaigners fail to reach a compromise next week.

"If it goes to the next step, we'll come back with a huge concert and really rock Berlin," said `The Hoff.'