Pope wants austerity

Pope wants austerity, Pope Francis, giving his clearest indication yet that he wants a more austere Catholic Church, said on Saturday that it should be poor and remember that its mission is to serve the poor.

Francis, speaking mostly off-the-cuff and smiling often, made his comments in an audience for journalists where he explained why he chose to take the name Francis, after St. Francis of Assisi, a symbol of peace, austerity and poverty.

He called Francis "the man who gives us this spirit of peace, the poor man", and added: "Oh, how I would like a poor Church, and for the poor."

Since his election on Wednesday as the first non-European pope in nearly 1,300 years, Francis has signaled a sharp change of style from his predecessor, Benedict, and has laid out a clear moral path for the 1.2-billion-member Church, which is beset by scandals, intrigue and strife.

He thanked the thousands of journalists who had covered his election but invited them to "always try to better understand the true nature of the Church, and even its journey in the world, with its virtues and with its sins".

He urged journalists to seek "truth, goodness and beauty" in the world and in the Church.

Francis has set a forceful moral tone and given clear signs already that he will bring a new broom to the crisis-hit papacy, favoring humility and simplicity over pomp and grandeur.

He recalled how on Wednesday night, as he was receiving more and more votes in the conclave, the cardinal sitting next to him, Claudio Hummes of Brazil, comforted him "as the situation became dangerous".

After the voting reached the two-thirds majority that elected him, applause broke out. Hummes, 78, then hugged and kissed him and told him "Don't forget the poor", the pope recounted, often gesturing with his hands.

"That word entered here," he added, pointing to his head.

While the formal voting continued, the pope recalled: "I thought of wars .... and Francis (of Assisi) is the man of peace, and that is how the name entered my heart, Francis of Assisi, for me he is the man of poverty, the man of peace, the man who loves and protects others."

It was the latest indication that the pope wanted the worldwide Church to take on an austere style.

On the night he was elected he shunned the papal limousine and travelled on a bus with other cardinals. He went to the Church-run hotel where he had been staying before the conclave and insisted on paying the bill.

Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, has also urged Argentines not to make costly trips to Rome to see him but to give the money to the poor instead.

RESPECT NATURE

St. Francis of Assisi, who died in 1226, renounced his family's fortune for a life of charity and poverty and is also revered by environmentalists because he loved nature and preached to animals.

"Right now, we don't have a very good relation with creation," the pope said.

He said that Catholics should remember that Jesus, not the pope, was the centre of the Church. At the end of his address, switching from Italian into Spanish, he also made a gesture to non-believers and members of other religions.

"I told you I would willingly give you a blessing. Since many of you do not belong to the Catholic Church and others are non-believers, from the bottom of my heart I give this silent blessing to each and every one of you, respecting the conscience of each one of you but knowing that each one of you is a child of God. May God bless all of you," he said.

CONTRAST WITH BENEDICT

The Vatican has strongly denied accusations by some critics in Argentina that Francis stayed silent during systematic human rights abuses by the former military dictatorship in his home country.

Spokesman Father Federico Lombardi told reporters on Friday that the accusations "must be clearly and firmly denied".

Critics of Bergoglio, the former Archbishop of Buenos Aires, allege he failed to protect priests who challenged the dictatorship earlier in his career, during the 1976-1983 "dirty war", and that he has said too little about the complicity of the Church during military rule.

The new pope's outgoing nature and sense of humor differs notably from the much more formal Benedict, who last month became the first pope in 600 years to resign.

On Friday, Francis hugged cardinals, slapped them on the back, broke into animated laughter and blessed religious objects one cardinal pulled out of a plastic shopping bag.

The Vatican said Francis would visit Benedict on March 23 at the papal summer residence south of Rome where the former pontiff will live until he moves into a convent in the Vatican which is undergoing renovations.

LBJ Nixon 'treason'

LBJ Nixon 'treason', Declassified tapes of President Lyndon Johnson's telephone calls provide a fresh insight into his world. Among the revelations - he planned a dramatic entry into the 1968 Democratic Convention to re-join the presidential race. And he caught Richard Nixon sabotaging the Vietnam peace talks... but said nothing.

After the Watergate scandal taught Richard Nixon the consequences of recording White House conversations none of his successors have dared to do it. But Nixon wasn't the first.

He got the idea from his predecessor Lyndon Johnson, who felt there was an obligation to allow historians to eventually eavesdrop on his presidency.

"They will provide history with the bark off," Johnson told his wife, Lady Bird.

The final batch of tapes released by the LBJ library covers 1968, and allows us to hear Johnson's private conversations as his Democratic Party tore itself apart over the question of Vietnam.

The 1968 convention, held in Chicago, was a complete shambles.

Tens of thousands of anti-war protesters clashed with Mayor Richard Daley's police, determined to force the party to reject Johnson's Vietnam war strategy.

As they taunted the police with cries of "The whole world is watching!" one man in particular was watching very closely.

Lyndon Baines Johnson was at his ranch in Texas, having announced five months earlier that he wouldn't seek a second term.

The president was appalled at the violence and although many of his staff sided with the students, and told the president the police were responsible for "disgusting abuse of police power," Johnson picked up the phone, ordered the dictabelt machine to start recording and congratulated Mayor Daley for his handling of the protest.

The president feared the convention delegates were about to reject his war policy and his chosen successor, Hubert Humphrey.

So he placed a series of calls to his staff at the convention to outline an astonishing plan. He planned to leave Texas and fly into Chicago.

He would then enter the convention and announce he was putting his name forward as a candidate for a second term.

It would have transformed the 1968 election. His advisers were sworn to secrecy and even Lady Bird did not know what her husband was considering.

On the White House tapes we learn that Johnson wanted to know from Daley how many delegates would support his candidacy. LBJ only wanted to get back into the race if Daley could guarantee the party would fall in line behind him.

They also discussed whether the president's helicopter, Marine One, could land on top of the Hilton Hotel to avoid the anti-war protesters.

Daley assured him enough delegates would support his nomination but the plan was shelved after the Secret Service warned the president they could not guarantee his safety.

The idea that Johnson might have been the candidate, and not Hubert Humphrey, is just one of the many secrets contained on the White House tapes.

They also shed light on a scandal that, if it had been known at the time, would have sunk the candidacy of Republican presidential nominee, Richard Nixon.

By the time of the election in November 1968, LBJ had evidence Nixon had sabotaged the Vietnam war peace talks - or, as he put it, that Nixon was guilty of treason and had "blood on his hands".

The BBC's former Washington correspondent Charles Wheeler learned of this in 1994 and conducted a series of interviews with key Johnson staff, such as defence secretary Clark Clifford, and national security adviser Walt Rostow.

But by the time the tapes were declassified in 2008 all the main protagonists had died, including Wheeler.

Now, for the first time, the whole story can be told.

It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war, and he knew this would derail his campaign.

He therefore set up a clandestine back-channel involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser.

At a July meeting in Nixon's New York apartment, the South Vietnamese ambassador was told Chennault represented Nixon and spoke for the campaign. If any message needed to be passed to the South Vietnamese president, Nguyen Van Thieu, it would come via Chennault.

In late October 1968 there were major concessions from Hanoi which promised to allow meaningful talks to get underway in Paris - concessions that would justify Johnson calling for a complete bombing halt of North Vietnam. This was exactly what Nixon feared.

Chennault was despatched to the South Vietnamese embassy with a clear message: the South Vietnamese government should withdraw from the talks, refuse to deal with Johnson, and if Nixon was elected, they would get a much better deal.

So on the eve of his planned announcement of a halt to the bombing, Johnson learned the South Vietnamese were pulling out.

He was also told why. The FBI had bugged the ambassador's phone and a transcripts of Anna Chennault's calls were sent to the White House. In one conversation she tells the ambassador to "just hang on through election".

Johnson was told by Defence Secretary Clifford that the interference was illegal and threatened the chance for peace.
President Nixon in 1970 with a map of Vietnam Nixon went on to become president and eventually signed a Vietnam peace deal in 1973

In a series of remarkable White House recordings we can hear Johnson's reaction to the news.

one call to Senator Richard Russell he says: "We have found that our friend, the Republican nominee, our California friend, has been playing on the outskirts with our enemies and our friends both, he has been doing it through rather subterranean sources. Mrs Chennault is warning the South Vietnamese not to get pulled into this Johnson move."

He orders the Nixon campaign to be placed under FBI surveillance and demands to know if Nixon is personally involved.

When he became convinced it was being orchestrated by the Republican candidate, the president called Senator Everett Dirksen, the Republican leader in the Senate to get a message to Nixon.

The president knew what was going on, Nixon should back off and the subterfuge amounted to treason.

Publicly Nixon was suggesting he had no idea why the South Vietnamese withdrew from the talks. He even offered to travel to Saigon to get them back to the negotiating table.

Johnson felt it was the ultimate expression of political hypocrisy but in calls recorded with Clifford they express the fear that going public would require revealing the FBI were bugging the ambassador's phone and the National Security Agency (NSA) was intercepting his communications with Saigon.

So they decided to say nothing.

The president did let Humphrey know and gave him enough information to sink his opponent. But by then, a few days from the election, Humphrey had been told he had closed the gap with Nixon and would win the presidency. So Humphrey decided it would be too disruptive to the country to accuse the Republicans of treason, if the Democrats were going to win anyway.

Nixon ended his campaign by suggesting the administration war policy was in shambles. They couldn't even get the South Vietnamese to the negotiating table.

He won by less than 1% of the popular vote.

Once in office he escalated the war into Laos and Cambodia, with the loss of an additional 22,000 American lives, before finally settling for a peace agreement in 1973 that was within grasp in 1968.

The White House tapes, combined with Wheeler's interviews with key White House personnel, provide an unprecedented insight into how Johnson handled a series of crises that rocked his presidency. Sadly, we will never have that sort of insight again.

Listen to the Archive On 4 programme: Wheeler: The Final Word, on BBC Radio 4 at 20.00 GMT on Saturday or for seven days afterwards on the BBC iPlayer.

Iditarod dog dies, Buried in Snow

Iditarod dog dies, A dog left behind at a checkpoint along the route of the Iditarod sled-dog race in Alaska was smothered by windblown snow, in the event's first canine death since 2009, officials said on Saturday.

The fatality broke a safety streak that race supporters had cited as evidence of good care for the animals at the center of the contest.

The dog, a 5-year-old male named Dorado in the team of musher Paige Drobny, was found dead on Friday at Unalakleet, an Inupiat Eskimo village and race checkpoint on the Bering Sea coast.

A necropsy, which is the animal equivalent of an autopsy, determined the cause of death was asphyxiation from being buried in snow in severe wind conditions, race marshal Mark Nordman said.

Iditarod mushers begin the race with up to 16 dogs, but they typically leave some at checkpoints as their animals tire. Most mushers finish with a team of about 10 dogs.

Dorado had been left at Unalakleet and was among a group of dogs set to be flown back to Anchorage, Nordman said. The animals were left outside, with their condition checked at 3 a.m. on Friday, he said.

"Between that time and daylight, drifting snow covered several dogs and Dorado was found to be deceased," Nordman said.

Dorado had been dropped off at Unalakleet because of sore muscles, said Iditarod spokeswoman Erin McLarnon.

Most dogs in the Iditarod are huskies or husky mixes.

Animal rights activists have criticized the Iditarod, saying competitors push the dogs too hard in racing and training and subject the animals to dangerous conditions.

"Our stance on the Iditarod has always been that people who care about dogs should not support the race. It's a cruel spectacle," said Ashley Byrne, campaign specialist for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

Iditarod mushers and officials have long defended the race's dog-care record, citing the army of volunteer veterinarians involved each year and the extensive dog health screening conducted before each race.

Sixty-six mushers and their dog teams began the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on March 2 in Anchorage. Mitch Seavey won the competition on Tuesday.

Drobny, the competitor whose dog died, reached the Nome finish line on Thursday, in 34th place.

This year's race was marred early on by tragedy. Three people, including a 10-year-old girl, were killed in a March 4 plane crash near Rainy Pass, one of the early race checkpoints. They had been headed to the Native village of Takotna, another checkpoint, to work as race volunteers.

George Clinton divorce

George Clinton divorce, behind P-funk groups Parliament and Funkadelic, has filed from divorce from his wife of 22 years, Stephanie Lynn Clinton.

According to divorce documents filed in a Florida court and obtained by TMZ, Clinton and his wife were married in Toledo, Ohio, in 1990. Over the two decades of their marriage, the two “have experienced long term separation” and said the “marriage is irretriviably broken.”

The couple have no children together and, according to the court documents, share no bank accounts or property.

2013 did not start off well for Clinton. Last month, the funk legend was forced to hand over the copyrights to four of his songs in order to pay off over $1 million he owed to former lawyers. Hendricks & Lewis law firm, who worked for Clinton from 2005 to 2008, won a $1.5 million lawsuit against him in 2010 after claiming that he failed to pay their fees.

The firm later claimed that Clinton only paid $340,000, and a federal judge ordered that he hand over the copyrights to four of his songs in lieu of payment. The four songs were: “Hardcore Jollies,” “The Electric Spanking of War Babies,” “Uncle Jam Wants You,” and “One Nation Under a Groove.” The firm can now sell or use those songs however it wants.

In 2010, a shooting after one of Clinton’s concerts in Cleveland, Ohio, left one person dead and three others wounded. A 16-year-old was killed and a 14, 20, and 23-year-old were injured. Police were puzzled by the shooting since, stating, “George Clinton and the other bands are basically from back in the 80s, that’s when they were at the height of their popularity. It’s not like it was a Lil Wayne concert or something when you have a bunch of 16, 17, 18-year-olds.”

George Clinton divorce, Wife wants Alimony

George Clinton divorce, The divorce of Clinton is in the works, as TMZ reported that the funk legend filed for divorce from his wife of 23-years. However, TMZ reported on March 16 that his wife has said she wants alimony in her response to the documents.

George Clinton filed the divorce documents in Florida and they state the couple married in 1990 but have been separated for a long term and their marriage is "irretrievable broken." It also states they have no children, no property together, and no bank accounts shared between the two. This looked to be an easy divorce because it is almost like they aren't married at all.
View slideshow: George Clinton divorce

Despite the fact they have allegedly been separated for a long time, Stephanie Clinton has disputed those claims. She also apparently disputed the fact that she doesn't deserve any financial reward in the divorce. Stephanie has asked for both temporary and permanent alimony and wants what she feels she is entitled to after 23 years of marriage.
George Clinton divorce
The judge in George Clinton divorce hearing will have to determine if the "long term" separation is true, and how much if anything that Stephanie is entitled to in the settlement. What looked to be an easy divorce has gotten nasty very fast.

Miley Cyrus tattoo

Miley Cyrus tattoo, Nothing like some fresh ink to get your mind off all those rocky relationship reports.

Miley Cyrus stopped by Kat Von D's studio High Voltage in Hollywood yesterday to get a brand new tattoo.

So what did Liam Hemsworth's 19-year-old girlfriend get inked this time?

"Just did the RADDEST tattoo on @MileyCyrus-a miniature rendition of a daVinci anatomical heart!" Von D posted on her Instagram with a photo of Cyrus' tat next to the original artwork inspiration.

Liam Hemsworth meets fans in Manila

Cyrus got the tattoo on the inside of her right forearm, right under her Roman numeral ink.

As for getting tatted, a source tells E! News that the singer went straight into Von D's office yesterday and was there for 10 minutes or so.

The source said it looked like Cyrus, "Just stopped by to hang out for a while." The source adds that Cyrus was dresses casually in, "Red and black-striped leggings with a plain black shirt."

Meanwhile, Cyrus, who's been enduring endless reports that her and Hemsworth are breaking up, retweeted earlier today, "Lies took over the world..... Facts don't really hold value anymore!"

Miley Cyrus tattoo, Cyrus Da Vinci Heart Tattoo

Miley Cyrus tattoo. Kat Von D announced her artwork via Twitter: "Just did the RADDEST tattoo on @MileyCyrus -a miniature rendition of a daVinci anatomical heart!"
As reports continue to buzz around Miley Cyrus' possible break-up with fiancé Liam Hemsworth, the 20-year-old star decided to take a break from the rumor mill by stepping into the tattoo parlor.

Reality star and celebrity tattoo artist Kat Von D inked Cyrus on her forearm, just below an existing tattoo on her elbow of Roman numerals.

"Just did the RADDEST tattoo on @MileyCyrus," Von D tweeted. "A miniature rendition of a da Vinci anatomical heart!"

Von D. posted a photo of the origina black-and-white illustration alongside her work.


Amid break-up rumore with her beau Liam Hemswoth, Miley Cyrus took a trip to the tattoo parlor to get some new ink.

Cyrus is no stranger to the tattoo parlor. The word "love" appears on the inside of her right ear, a pair of crossed arrows on her back, and a small cross, heart, and peace sign decorate her fingers. The star also has a dream catcher on her side, and equal sign on her finger representing marriage equality, and the phrase "Just Breathe" on her chest.

The singer and Hemworth, 23, even have matching tattoos---different quotes from a speech by Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Earlier this week, Cyrus stepped out without a wedding ring, fueling rumors that she and Hemsworth had broken off their engagement.

But the partially explained the absence on twitter. A back-up singer, Lindsey J. Lee tweeted on Thursday that she had to send off her engagement ring to get fixed.

"Ugh that's the worst!" Cyrus replied. "I just had a similar situation except when it happens to me then everyone says my wedding is off."

Malachi Throne dies

Malachi Throne dies, The veteran Celebrity TV actor also starred as Robert Wagner's boss on "It Takes a Thief" and on "Star Trek" after he turned down the role of Dr. McCoy.

Malachi Throne, the veteran TV actor who played Robert Wagner's boss on It Takes a Thief and the enigmatic evildoer False-Face on Batman, died Wednesday in Los Angeles of lung cancer. He was 84.

Justified actor Jim Beaver reported Throne's death Thursday on his Facebook page. “My good friend Malachi Throne died last night. One of the finest actors and finest people I've been fortunate enough to know,” the entry said.

Throne provided the voice of the Talosian leader The Keeper for "The Cage," the pilot episode of Star Trek, and in 1966 played Commodore José Mendez in the only two-parter of the original series.

Earlier, he rejected Gene Roddenberry's offer to play Dr. Leonard McCoy on the series after Throne lobbied for the role of Spock. "There's an old saying among actors: 'Never be the third man through the door,' and I felt I would always be the third man in that role," he once said.

Throne also worked on Star-Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek New Voyages: Phase II. And with his distinctive deep voice, he narrated the original trailer for Star Wars (1977).

The action-adventure It Takes a Thief, inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief (1955), starring Cary Grant, ran on ABC from January 1968 to March 1970. It starred Wagner as sophisticated thief Alexander Mundy, who is freed from jail so he can steal for the U.S. government.

Throne's Noah Bain worked for the Secret Intelligence Agency and frequently threatened to return Mundy to prison if he didn't do what he was told.

Throne exited It Takes a Thief in the third season and was replaced by Edward Binns, reportedly upset when the series was to film in Italy and he was being asked to stay behind and give Wagner's character orders over the phone.

On ABC's Batman, Throne's face was never seen as he strapped on a bizarre plastic mask when he wasn't posing as Chief O'Hara, Commissioner Gordon and others as False-Face in 1966. In the series' traditional two-part format, he is mysteriously credited as "?" in the first part (but as Thone in the second).

"Everyone wanted to know who played False-Face. It was a two-part episode, so after the first week the papers were abuzz," he once said. "Eventually, I cooled down and let them put my name at the end of the second episode. It was the best press I ever got in my life."

Born Dec. 1, 1928, in New York City, Throne played Huckleberry Finn at age 10 in the New York Parks Department's production of Tom Sawyer. He worked in off-Broadway and Broadway productions before guest-starring on scores of TV shows, including Naked City, The Untouchables, 77 Sunset Strip, Ben Casey, The Defenders, The Fugitive, I Spy, The Big Valley, The Time Tunnel, Hogan's Heroes, Hawaii Five-O, What's Happening!, Babylon 5, Melrose Place and Avatar: The Last Airbender.

Throne was an active member of the Theatre West company in Los Angeles. He was scheduled to appear in The Fantasticks there this past fall but had to withdraw because of his fading health, publicist Philip Sokoloff said. His wife said Throne was cremated and there will be no services.

"Theatre West says goodbye to our friend and colleague Malachi Throne," said a message on the theater's home page.

Malachi Throne dies, at the age 84

Malachi Throne dies, Malachi Throne is dead. The character actor, most known for his memorable appearances on "Star Trek" and "Batman," died Wednesday, Mar. 13. after succumbing to cancer. He was 84.

Friend and "Justified" actor Jim Beaver appears to have been among the first to break the news to the public, via his Facebook page. "My good friend Malachi Throne died last night. One of the finest actors and finest people I've been fortunate enough to know," he wrote.


Malachi Throne Dead
TV actor Malachi Throne has died at age 84




Throne's agent, Annette Robinson, confirmed the actor's passing to The Huffington Post, saying the actor had been battling cancer for some time and that he had died peacefully in his sleep.

Throne acted in more than 90 different television shows over a span of five decades; he first appeared on "The DuPont Show of the Month" in 1959. Fans will remember him as Robert Wagner's boss Noah Bain on the series "It Takes a Thief" and as False Face on "Batman," for which he wore a semi-transparent mask. On playing the latter character, Throne said: "Everyone wanted to know who played False-Face. It was a two-part episode, so after the first week the papers were abuzz. Eventually, I cooled down and let them put my name at the end of the second episode. It was the best press I ever got in my life."

Throne was born in New York City to parents who emigrated from the Austro-Hungarian Empire; he later served in the Korean War in the 1950s. He is survived by his wife Marjorie and his two sons, actors Zachary and Joshua.

Casey Anthony bankruptcy

Casey Anthony bankruptcy, About Two years ago, her murder trial for the death of her toddler riveted the country, ending with Anthony's dramatic acquittal. But she was convicted on four counts of lying to authorities.

On Friday, an appeals court threw out two of those convictions.

Now, the 26-year-old has filed for bankruptcy, citing almost $800,000 in liabilities.

And her legal struggles are far from over.

Bankruptcy motive questioned

Anthony sought Chapter 7 protection in a federal court in Tampa on Friday, soon after the appeals court ruling.

Such a filing is meant to allow one to do away with most existing debts and make a fresh start financially.

In the documents, Anthony says she owes almost $800,000 to about 80 creditors, and she has no income.

She is also defending herself against several civil lawsuits, including a defamation suit from Zenaida Fernandez-Gonzalez, who claims Anthony ruined her reputation.

In 2008, Anthony told an investigator the last time she saw her 2-year-old daughter Caylee was when she dropped Caylee off at Gonzalez's apartment.

Gonzalez's attorney, Matt Morgan, told CNN affiliate Central Florida News 13 he believes the bankruptcy filing is an attempt to postpone the case.

"This most recent filing appears to be yet another calculated delay tactic," Morgan said. "We are not deterred and will stay the course."

But an attorney for Anthony told the affiliate his client is distraught that she can't pay her legal fees.

"To some extent she feels, she feels bad that she's having to have all these legal services provided to her and she is unable to compensate anyone," Andy Chmelir said. "So she wants closure more than anything else."

What she has and what she owes

Anthony listed about $1,000 in personal property, according to court documents obtained by News 13. The listed property values include:

- Cash on hand: $474

- Furniture and laptop: $200

- Jewelry: $200

- Clothing and accessories: $100

The documents also list people that might have a claim against Anthony, which includes her mother and consultants that helped in her criminal case, News 13 reported.

Claims listed in the filing include:

- Jose Baez, the lead defense attorney during Anthony's trial: $500,000

- Orange County Sheriff's Office: $145,660.21

- Internal Revenue Service: $68,540

- Cindy and George Anthony, her parents: Unknown amounts

Anthony: "We keep fighting" after two convictions tossed

The filing came the same day Florida's 5th District Court of Appeal threw out two of Anthony's four convictions of lying to authorities as they investigated the disappearance of Caylee.

The appeals judges agreed with Anthony's argument that the multiple convictions amounted to double jeopardy. But the judges upheld the other two convictions.

According to Friday's court filing, the appeals judges rejected Anthony's claim that statements she made before being read her Miranda rights should not have been allowed in the trial. And they rejected her argument that the state statute she was convicted of violating is unconstitutionally vague.

Attorney Cheney Mason said when he called his client to share the ruling that two of the four convictions had been overturned, Anthony said, "We keep fighting."

Anthony could appeal the remaining two convictions to the Florida Supreme Court next.

Caylee Anthony's death and the emotional trial

In an internationally publicized case, Anthony was tried in 2011 and acquitted of murder charges in the death of Caylee.

The child was last seen June 16, 2008, but was not reported missing until July 15, 2008, when Casey Anthony's mother tracked her daughter down and demanded answers about Caylee's whereabouts.

Investigators searched for the child for five months, eventually finding Caylee's skeletal remains in woods less than a mile from her grandparents' Orlando home.

Read how Anthony's prosecutor has no regrets

When questioned early in the investigation, Casey Anthony admitted to police that she hadn't seen Caylee for more than 30 days, and on July 16, 2008, she was arrested on suspicion of child neglect, filing false official statements and obstructing a criminal investigation.

After almost three years of legal maneuvers, Anthony's capital murder trial began on May 24, 2011.

Prosecutors alleged that she killed Caylee by using chloroform and covering her nose and mouth with duct tape, and that she put her body in the trunk of her car before dumping it in the woods.

Defense attorney Jose Baez argued that Caylee drowned in the Anthony family pool on June 16, 2008, and that Casey Anthony and her father, George, covered up the death.

Watch: A year after trial, where's Anthony?

On July 5, 2011, a jury found Anthony not guilty of first-degree murder, aggravated child abuse and aggravated manslaughter of a child, while convicting her on the four "false information" counts.

Anthony was sentenced to four years in jail, to be served consecutively. But with her time in jail as she awaited trial counting against the jail terms, she was released 10 days after her sentencing.

Casey Anthony bankruptcy, Speak at Hearing


Trash worker crushed

Trash worker crushed, A teen worker was crushed to death by a private recycling truck in Brooklyn today, police said.

Luis Camarillo, 18, of the Bronx was working at the back of the truck at a recycling plant in DUMBO on Plymouth Street about 10:30 a.m. when the compactor came down on him, cops said.

He was hit in the chest, and then crushed by the truck’s hydraulics system, authorities said.

“The guy got squashed between the pay loader and the truck,” said Tony Lima, who works nearby.

Luis Camarillo, crushed to death.

When EMS arrived on the scene, they found Camarillo unconscious. He died at Long Island College Hospital.

The NYPD is investigating the grisly accident, as well as OSHA, a federal agency. No criminality is suspected at this time.

Robert Stewarts, an OSHA compliance officer said they were looking to see if any health and safety standards were violated, and that he was reviewing surveillance video at the plant.

Camarillo’s grieving relatives said the teen had only been working at the plant for three weeks and were happy he was staying out of trouble.

“His mother is devastated,” said Lucero Ariza, Camarillo’s 22-year-old cousin. The pain of a mother has no words. That was her only son."

Trash worker crushed, Killed in Brooklyn




Trash worker crushed, An 18-year-old worker was crushed to death by a private recycling truck in Brooklyn on Saturday morning, New York City police said.

Recycling facility

The New York Post reported that Luis Camarillo, 18, of the Bronx was working at the back of the truck at a recycling plant in the Dumbo neighborhood on Saturday morning when the compactor came down on him.

He was hit in the chest, and then crushed by the truck’s hydraulics system, an official said.

Camarillo was taken to Long Island College Hospital where he was pronounced dead, according to the police.

Camarillo’s grieving relatives told the Post that the teen had only been working at the plant for three weeks and were happy he was staying out of trouble.

The NYPD and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, a federal agency, are investigating the accident.

Hot for Teacher' lawsuit

Hot for Teacher' lawsuit. A man suspended from a Detroit-area university after writing about his attraction to teachers in a class journal sued the school Friday for $2.2 million and four lost credits, claiming his free-speech rights were violated.

Joseph Corlett, 57, a home builder who enrolled in college because of the weak economy, said he was an A-student in a writing class at Oakland University in Rochester until he submitted a journal in 2011 titled "Hot For Teacher," the name of a song by the rock band Van Halen.

Corlett compared his female instructor to Ginger, a sultry movie starlet character on the 1960s TV show "Gilligan's Island." He feared being distracted and said, "I'll never learn a thing." He said another teacher who was pregnant was "hot, and not just from baking the bun in her oven."

The teacher informed an Oakland dean after reading the journal for the first time. Officials said Corlett's writings violated a policy against intimidation or harassment and last year barred him for three terms, through winter 2013. The university said he must undergo counseling if he wants to return as a student.

In an interview, Corlett, who now lives in Sarasota, Fla., said he's fighting for his civil rights.

"When you get past the titillation, you've got to look into what's really going on here," he said. "It's academic freedom or no academic freedom. We're all collectively dumbed when speech is suppressed or challenged."

Oakland spokesman David Groves said the school doesn't comment on lawsuits.

Corlett said students in the English 380 class were told to write "raw things, a personal diary that maybe we wouldn't want anyone to read." He said the teacher had no objection to his earlier work, which earned an A, an essay about accidentally seeing women's breasts.

"There is no constitutional protection against being offended," Corlett said. "And while I am sympathetic to anyone's feelings, I repeatedly asked for instruction. I was repeatedly told there were no topics that were out of bounds."

Corlett was removed from the writing class by two police officers after an Oakland administrator forgot to tell him that he was barred from attending while his status as a student was under review.

Attorney Alari Adams said Corlett is seeking $2.2 million for mental anguish and the embarrassment of being kicked out of school.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/15/mich-college-student-suspended-over-hot-for-teacher-journal-files-free-speech/#ixzz2NlbLxLYB

Hot for Teacher' lawsuit. filed against Michigan College

'Hot for Teacher' lawsuit, A "Hot for Teacher" lawsuit was filed against a college in Michigan and it has little to do with the popular Van Halen song. According to Fox News on March 15, a student sued Oakland University for banning him for writing an essay based on the lyrics to the popular song.

According to the "Hot for Teacher" lawsuit, 57-year-old Joseph Corlett turned in an assignment calling for students to write "raw things, a personal diary that maybe we wouldn't want anyone to read." Corlett chose a topic that has been a curious taboo for years, a student's infatuation with their teacher.

In the "raw" journal entry, Corlett wrote that one teacher reminded him of Ginger from the popular classic television series "Gilligan's Island" and another was hot, and not just because she was pregnant with a "bun in her oven."

The teacher was offended and showed it to the dean who then expelled Corlett for three terms and had the audacity to order him to seek counseling if he wants to return as a student. The "Hot for Teacher" lawsuit argues that his free speech was infringed upon by the university, especially since he said he asked about the limitations and the teacher said nothing was "out of bounds."

'Hot for Teacher' lawsuit: Van Halen song basis of banned college paper

The "Hot for Teacher" lawsuit asks for $2.2 million in damages, mentioning the embarrassment he suffered when police were called to escort him from the campus.

The Van Halen song "Hot for Teacher" was released in 1984 on the band's "1984" album and remains a pop cultural phenomenon, most recently re-introduced to kids through the "Guitar Hero" video games.

Former governor dies

Former governor dies, Gardner, a two-times Democratic governor who later in life spearheaded a campaign that made Washington the second state in the nation to legalize assisted suicide for the terminally ill, has died after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 76.

Gardner died Friday at his Tacoma home, said family spokesman Ron Dotzauer.

The millionaire heir to the Weyerhaeuser timber fortune served as the state's 19th governor from 1985 to 1993 following terms as Pierce County executive, state senator and business school dean.

Since then, he had worked as a U.S. trade ambassador in Geneva, in youth sports and for a variety of philanthropic works. But his biggest political effort in later years was his successful "Death with Dignity" campaign in 2008 that led to the passage of the controversial law that mirrored one in place in Oregon since 1997.

Washington state had rejected a similar assisted-suicide initiative in 1991. But after a contentious campaign, in which Gardner contributed $470,000 of his own money toward the $4.9 million raised to support the measure, nearly 58% of voters approved the new law.

The law allows terminally ill adults with six months or less left to live to request a legal dose of medication from their doctors.

Gardner knew that he wouldn't qualify to use the law because his Parkinson's disease was incurable, not fatal. But his worsening condition made him a right-to-die advocate.

"There's more people who would like to have control over their final days than those who don't," Gardner told the Associated Press at the time.

Since the Washington law took effect in March 2009, more than 250 people have used it to obtain lethal doses of medication.

A 2009 documentary about his crusade, "The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner," was nominated for an Academy Award.

As governor, Gardner pushed for standards-based education reform, issued an executive order banning discrimination against gay and lesbian state workers, banned smoking in state workplaces and appointed the first minority to the state Supreme Court. He also oversaw the 1987 launch of the state's Basic Health Care program for the poor.

William Booth Gardner was born Aug. 21, 1936, in Tacoma to a socialite mother, Evelyn Booth, and Bresson "Brick" Gardner. His father was an alcoholic who was cruel to his son, according to Booth Gardner's biographer.

After his parents divorced when he was 4, his mother married Morton Clapp, a wealthy former president of Weyerhaeuser who helped build the Space Needle for the 1962 World's Fair.

Early in life, Gardner endured tragedy. His mother and 13-year-old sister were killed in a plane crash in 1951, an event he later said "had a greater effect on me than anything else in my life." It also left him with an inheritance that made him a millionaire.

In 1966 his father fell to his death from a ninth-floor Honolulu hotel room balcony.

Clapp remained a presence in Gardner's life, and though he was a Republican, made significant donations to Gardner's gubernatorial runs.

Gardner earned bachelor's and law degrees from the University of Washington and a master's in business administration from Harvard University.

While abroad in 1995 he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. In 2000, he launched the Booth Gardner Parkinson's Care Center, a clinic in Kirkland, Wash.

Twice divorced, Gardner is survived by two children from his first marriage, his son Doug and daughter, Gail; and grandchildren.

Former governor dies, at the age 76

Former governor dies, Booth Gardner was a two-term governor whose biggest political effort came long after he left the Washington state Capitol.

Gardner, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease two years after he ended his final term as the state's 19th governor, spearheaded a campaign that made Washington the second state in the country to legalize assisted suicide for the terminally ill.
Booth Gardner Dead
In this Oct. 25, 2006 file photo, Booth Gardner sits in Wright Park, near his home in Tacoma. Gardner, a two-term Democratic governor who later in life spearheaded a campaign that made Washington the second state in the country to legalize assisted suicide for the terminally ill, has died after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 76. Gardner died Friday, March 15, 2013 at his Tacoma home, family spokesman Ron Dotzauer said Saturday. He was the state's 19th governor.


While Gardner knew he wouldn't qualify to use the law – Parkinson's disease itself, while incurable, is not fatal – he said at the time that his worsening condition made him an advocate for those who want control over how they die.

He died at age 76 on Friday at his Tacoma home of complications related to the disease, family spokesman Ron Dotzauer said Saturday. He is survived by his son, Doug, his daughter, Gail Gant, and eight grandchildren.

"We're very sad to lose my father, who had been struggling with a difficult disease for many years, but we are relieved to know that he's at rest now and his fight is done," Gant said in a written statement.

The millionaire heir to the Weyerhaeuser timber fortune led the state from 1985 to 1993 following terms as Pierce County executive, state senator and business school dean.

Since then, he had worked as a U.S. trade ambassador in Geneva, in youth sports and for a variety of philanthropic works. But he may be best known for what he called his final campaign: his successful "Death with Dignity" campaign in 2008 that ultimately led to the passage of the law that mirrored one that had been in place in Oregon since 1997.

"It's amazing to me how much this can help people get peace of mind," Gardner told The Associated Press at the time. "There's more people who would like to have control over their final days than those who don't."

The law allows terminally ill adults with six months or less left to live to request a lethal dose of medication from their doctors.

The Washington law took effect in March 2009, and since then more than 250 people have used it to obtain lethal doses of medication.

A documentary about that campaign, "The Last Campaign of Booth Gardner," was nominated for an Academy Award in 2010. A biography published by the Washington state Heritage Center's Legacy Project, titled "Booth Who?" – after a campaign slogan on political buttons created during his first run for governor – was published that same year.

William Booth Gardner was born Aug. 21, 1936, in Tacoma to his socialite mother, Evelyn Booth and Bryson "Brick" Gardner. According to his biography, he was first named Frederick, but a few days after his birth, his parents changed his birth certificate, crossing out Frederick and replacing it with William.

While even Gardner reportedly didn't know what led to that early confusion over his name, the change to William was believed to be a nod to his paternal grandfather, who had founded a successful plumbing and heating business in Tacoma. Even so, Gardner always went by "Booth."

His parents divorced when he was 4 and his mother remarried Norton Clapp, one of the state's wealthiest citizens who was a former president of Weyerhaeuser and was one of a group of industrialists who helped build the Space Needle for the 1962 World's Fair.

Gardner had his share of tragedy: his mother and 13-year-old sister were killed in a plane crash in 1951 and his father, who had struggled with alcohol, fell to his death from a ninth-floor Honolulu hotel room balcony in 1966.

Clapp remained a presence in Gardner's life, and though he was a Republican, he made significant donations to both of Gardner's gubernatorial runs.

In November 1984, Gardner beat Republican Gov. John Spellman with 53 percent of the vote, winning 23 of the state's 39 counties.

"Booth's imprint on our state will long be seen in our classrooms and the many open spaces he fought to protect. Up until the very end of his life Booth remained a fighter for the issues he cared most about -- those of us who knew him couldn't have imagined it any other way," Democratic U.S. Sen. Patty Murray said in a written statement.

During his two terms, Gardner pushed for standards-based education reform, issued an executive order banning discrimination against gay and lesbian state workers, banned smoking in state workplaces, and appointed the state's first minority to the state Supreme Court. The state's Basic Health Care program for the poor was launched in 1987 and was the first of its kind in the country.

Toward the end of his first term, he appointed Chris Gregoire, then an assistant attorney general, as head of the Department of Ecology. Gregoire went on to be attorney general, and then governor. Gardner was easily re-elected in 1988, garnering 62 percent of the vote. In his second term, he and Gregoire, then attorney general, secured an agreement with the federal government that the nuclear waste at Hanford nuclear site would be cleaned up in the coming decades, and Gardner banned any further shipments of radioactive waste to Hanford from other states. The state Department of Health was also created under his watch.

"He will be remembered as a leader whose natural style of civility, respectfulness and collaboration served our state very well. We could certainly use more Booth Gardners today," said U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, who served as Gardner's chief of staff during his second term.

Gregoire, who stepped down as governor in January after not seeking a third term, called Gardner's death "a huge loss to the state."

"He was a guy where you could disagree with him on an issue, but you could never be disagreeable with him, because he would never be disagreeable with you" Gregoire told The Associated Press. "He was a unique talent."

In 1991, Gardner announced he wouldn't seek a third term, saying he was "out of gas." He went on to become the U.S. ambassador to the General Agreement on Tariffs & Trade in Geneva. While abroad, in 1995, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Gardner didn't make his battle with the disease public until 2000, when he discussed it in an interview on TVW, the state's public affairs network. That same year, he launched a clinic in Kirkland, the Booth Gardner Parkinson's Care Center.

He announced his plan for a ballot measure to allow assisted suicide in 2006 as he continued to battle Parkinson's. Twice in 2007, he traveled to the University of California at San Francisco for innovative deep-brain surgery that included implanting a type of pacemaker that helps restore control of his body.

Washington state had already rejected a similar assisted suicide initiative in 1991, but after a contentious campaign, where Gardner contributed $470,000 of his own money of the $4.9 million raised in support of the measure, nearly 58 percent of voters approved the new law in 2008.

In his biography, when asked how he wanted to be remembered, he responded, "I tried to help people."

"I got out of the office and talked with real people, and I think I made a difference."

Pregnant coach dies,

Pregnant coach dies, was a headline that trended on Saturday. On March 16, Time reported that the pregnant coach -- 30-year-old Kristina Quigley -- was on the bus carrying the Penn. Lacrosse team when it crashed into a tree. Quigley was one of two people killed (not including the coach's unborn child) -- the other was the bus driver.

According to the report, Quigley was rushed to the hospital via helicopter following the accident which occurred around 9 a.m. on the Penn. Turnpike. She died from her injuries and her unborn baby, who was due in about 3 months, did not make it.

The pregnant coach died from unknown injuries. The report wasn't clear as to where she was on the bus or why her injuries were more serious than the others on the bus. While several of the 23 people were taken to a local hospital to be checked out, Quigley and the bus driver -- 61-year-old Anthony Guaetta of Johnstown -- are the only two confirmed deaths at this point.

"Two other victims were flown by helicopter to Penn State Hershey Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Danielle Ran said. She did not give their conditions. Officials said all other passengers were taken to hospitals as a precaution," Time reported.

The pregnant coach dies leaving behind her husband and one young son named Gavin.

Pregnant coach dies, in deadly buss crash

This undated photo provided by Seton Hill University shows womens college lacrosse coach Kristina Quigley. A tour bus carrying the Seton Hill womens lacrosse team to a game went off the Pennsylvania Turnpike on Saturday, March 16, 2013, and crashed into a tree. Authorities said the accident killed the driver and Kristina Quigley, who was about six months pregnant, and sent others to the hospital. (AP Photo/Courtesy Seton Hill University)
This undated photo provided by Seton Hill University shows women's college lacrosse coach Kristina Quigley. A tour bus carrying the Seton Hill women's lacrosse team to a game went off the Pennsylvania Turnpike on Saturday, March 16, 2013, and crashed into a tree. Authorities said the accident killed the driver and Kristina Quigley, who was about six months pregnant, and sent others to the hospital. 
Pregnant coach dies, A road trip by a college women's lacrosse team came to a horrifying end Saturday when the team bus veered off the Pennsylvania Turnpike and crashed into a tree, killing a pregnant coach, her unborn child, and the driver, and injuring numerous others, authorities said.

Seton Hill University team players and coaches were among the 23 people aboard when the bus crashed just before 9 a.m. No other vehicle was involved, and police couldn't immediately say what caused the crash.

Coach Kristina Quigley, 30, of Greensburg, was flown to a hospital but died there of her injuries, Cumberland County authorities said. Quigley was about six months pregnant and her unborn child didn't survive, authorities said. The bus driver, Anthony Guaetta, 61, of Johnstown, died at the scene.

The other passengers were removed from the bus within an hour and taken to hospitals as a precaution. The crash appeared to have shorn away the front left side of the bus, which rested upright about 70 yards from the road at the bottom of a grassy slope.

The lacrosse team was headed to play Saturday afternoon at Millersville University, about 50 miles from the crash site in central Pennsylvania, for its fourth game of the year.

Both Saturday's game and a Sunday home game were canceled after the crash, and Seton Hill, a Catholic liberal arts school of about 2,500 students near Pittsburgh, said a memorial Mass was planned for Sunday night on campus.

Duquesne University women's lacrosse coach Mike Scerbo remembered Quigley as a warm, outgoing person who immediately impressed him when he hired her to be an assistant during the 2008 season.

Quigley, also a Duquesne alum, spent just one season under Scerbo before moving to South Carolina to start Erskine College's NCAA Division II program.

"In that time, I really saw how much passion she had to be a coach, and how much she enjoyed working with the kids," Scerbo said. "She was a teacher, and she wanted to help kids grow and learn, not just about the sport, but about life."

She spent three years at Erskine before taking the top job at Seton Hill for the 2012 season. She stayed in touch with Scerbo, often seeking his guidance and showing up at the Duquesne alumni game.

"She was a very happy person, very passionate about life, about her players, about her job and most importantly about her family," Scerbo said.

Quigley, a native of Baltimore, was married and had a young son, Gavin, the school said.

The bus operator, Mlaker Charter & Tours, of Davidsville, Pa., is up-to-date on its inspections, which include bus and driver safety checks, said Jennifer Kocher, a spokeswoman for the state Public Utility Commission, which regulates bus companies.

The agency's motor safety inspectors could think of no accidents or violations involving the company that would raise a red flag, she said, though complete safety records weren't available Saturday.

On Tuesday, another bus carrying college lacrosse players from a Vermont team was hit by a sports car that spun out of control on a wet highway in upstate New York, sending the bus toppling onto its side, police said. One person in the car died.

And last month, a bus carrying 42 high school students from the Philadelphia area and their chaperones slammed into an overpass in Boston, injuring 35. Authorities said the driver had directed the bus onto a road with a height limit.

$7 billion swindle

$7 Billion Swindle, Investors in a $7 billion Ponzi scheme orchestrated by former Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford could finally begin getting back some of what they lost in the next few months, after a recovery process that has dragged on for more than four years.

Investors — some of whom lost their life savings — will see only a pittance of what they put into the scheme. But the process got a boost this week as parties that had been battling each other for control of about $300 million in frozen foreign bank accounts and other assets once owned by Stanford reached an agreement to work together......theoaklandpress.

“The freeing up of funds ... is a good thing,” Angela Shaw, a Dallas-area woman who founded the Stanford Victims Coalition after three generations of her family lost $4.5 million in the fraud, said Friday.

In a Ponzi scheme, money from new investors is used to pay old ones. Prosecutors said Stanford persuaded investors to buy certificates of deposit, or CDs, from his bank on the Caribbean island nation of Antigua then used the money to fund a string of failed businesses, bribe regulators and pay for his lavish lifestyle. Stanford, 62, was convicted last year on 13 fraud-related counts and sentenced to 110 years in prison.

Stanford’s financial empire once spanned from the U.S. to Latin America and the Caribbean. In the wake of its collapse, a U.S. judge in Dallas and an Antiguan court both appointed people to try to recover assets. The U.S. Justice Department also undertook its own effort.

This week’s agreement consolidates the efforts to take control of assets frozen in Canada, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

“Without the ... agreement, the (parties) will be forced to expend substantial time, energy and money fighting over the Stanford assets,” attorneys for Ralph Janvey, the receiver appointed by a judge in Dallas to oversee the recovery efforts, wrote in a court motion filed this week.

Edward Davis Jr., one of the attorneys for the Antiguan liquidators, said the agreement is the “beginning of relationship that allows for everyone to be rolling in the same direction.”

British retiree Kate Freeman, who lost $820,000 in Stanford’s scheme, said she believes the agreement is a positive step.

“This will help all of the victims,” Freeman said in a telephone interview from her home in Antigua. “This will put a little bit of money in everyone’s pocket.”
Freeman said the agreement will provide the liquidators in Antigua needed funds to pursue lawsuits against individuals and organizations who aided Stanford’s fraud.

The first distribution to investors will probably come from the U.S. receiver, who in January announced a plan to make an initial distribution of $55 million. That plan is still waiting for approval by a federal judge, but that could happen within the next month or two, officials say.

As of the end of January, Janvey had collected more than $230 million. But he had also racked up more than $119 million in fees and expenses, leaving about $111 million for investors.

Investors have criticized the amount of fees and expenses that have been tallied by the recovery process. Attorneys for Janvey have defended the expenses, saying the collapse of Stanford’s business empire required an expensive clean up.

The Antiguan liquidators have retained control of about $227 million in assets, mostly in land once owned by Stanford, Davis said. That money won’t be available for distribution until the land is sold.

The initial distribution from the liquidators will likely come by this summer from funds recovered from the United Kingdom, he said.

The amount investors will ultimately get back is expected to be small — probably about 1 percent of what they put in.

“If you’ve saved your whole life and invested $300,000, you are only getting back $3,000,” Shaw said.

Andrew Stoltmann, a Chicago-based attorney who specializes in investment fraud, said such small recoveries are the norm.

“Unfortunately these sorts of recoveries are kind of the nature of the beast when it comes to Ponzi schemes,” he said.

Robert Relyea dies, at the age 82

Robert Relyea dies,The film producer and director whose credits included “The Magnificent Seven” and “West Side Story has died. Robert E. Relyea was 82.

A spokeswoman for Relyea says he died March 5 of natural causes in Los Angeles.

Relyea’s career spanned over 40 years. He worked with stars such as John Wayne on “The Alamo” and Elvis Presley on “Jailhouse Rock.”

He collaborated with Steve McQueen on several films, including “Bullitt,” ‘’Le Mans” and “The Reivers.”

Relyea started as an MGM crew member in 1955 and served as president of production at MGM-United Artists from 1997 to 2001. He released his autobiography, “Not So Quiet on the Set,” in 2008.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; five children; two stepchildren and grandchildren.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Couple's dying wish for dream wedding

Couple's dying wish for dream wedding, Marrying his high school sweetheart in his hometown of Kewanee, Ill., was a day Nolan Keane had dreamed of but didn't know if he'd live to see.

That's because Keane, 28, has been battling brain cancer for the past four years -- fighting the disease for almost four full years longer than doctors originally expected.

"We have wanted to do this for a long time and we've talked about it for a really long time," his sweetheart, Morgan Carstens, 26, said of the wedding. "It's amazing that we get to see our friends and family and be together."

Keane, whom Carstens now proudly calls her husband, was diagnosed with an aggressive type of brain cancer in 2008 and told he had one year to live.

The diagnosis of stage 4 glioblastoma multiforme was devastating for the Missouri State University grad and former Division I baseball player, but he was determined to fight.

Fight he did, undergoing eight brain surgeries and rounds of chemotherapy and trial treatments, with Carstens all the while by his side.

Carstens, a 26-year-old registered nurse, put her work on hold, moving in with Keane's family to care for him, helping him with the simple things like getting dressed, taking a shower or walking without his wheelchair.

"I didn't think twice about it. I knew he needed me and I would kind of feel guilty taking care of others," she said. "We just take it day by day and we make it work. ... You get put in a situation and you do what you have to do."

Last November, on a family trip to Disney World, Keane proposed to Carstens, getting out of his wheelchair and down on one knee, to her surprise.

"We went to go see the fireworks. Since there was so much walking, he told me, 'My back is really hurting. Can you get me out the wheelchair?' And then [he] got down on one knee and I forgot to say yes. I think he kind of knew by my response," she said.

After the results of a recent MRI showed that Keane's cancer had spread and he had months left to live, Keane told family and friends his final wishes were to marry Carstens -- something he considered long overdue -- and take their honeymoon to the place he proposed, Walt Disney World.

"He just loves that place and has gone every year growing up," she said. "He's a little kid at heart and when he goes it brings back so many good memories. [It is] a place to forget about all the bad things and enjoy every single moment."

Friends and family set out to make the couple's final days together the most memorable possible.

Carstens' sisters, Jaclyn Carstens and Lindsey Williamson, were determined to help give the couple the "dream wedding" they felt they deserved but couldn't afford on their own. They rallied the community, raising money and awareness on Facebook.

Then, in late February, they set up a fundraising page on GiveForward.com, a website that specializes in raising money in a medical crisis, and it went viral. The couple's story was first reported in the Chicago Sun-Times and spread.

In only four days, complete strangers contributed $60,000 -- far exceeding their initial $20,000 goal -- to put towards their honeymoon to Disney World. Now, the donations have totaled $66,397, shocking Keane and Carstens.

 "We have been only asking for support, encouragement and prayers, so when all of this blew up we all had every single emotion as possible about it. It's inspiring to see so many good-hearted and caring people out there," Carstens said. "We were kind of in shock. We'll sit up and we'll read [the comments], and sometimes we'll cry and smile. We are blessed."

On March 9, Keane got his first wish fulfilled. The two tied the knot in Peoria, Ill., surrounded by friends and family. Local wedding vendors donated everything, including the photographer, hair and makeup for the bridal party, and food, to make their big day a fairy tale.

"It started with flowers and friends donating some food," Carstens said, "and then a wedding planner donated her time to get things together. It's been an outpouring from the community. They've made this whole day possible for us."

Their slogan, "Nolan Wins," which has been printed on wristbands worn by supporters throughout Keane's fight against brain cancer, was tweaked for the occasion: "Nolan Wins, Nolan Weds."

"He's been such a fighter. He's grown into such an amazing person. He was amazing person and he's even more amazing now," the bride said.

Carstens said they plan to take their honeymoon to Disney World at the end of March and put the rest of the money towards medical bills and towards making the accommodations at Keane's parents' home even more wheelchair-friendly.

"This experience has made us look at life differently," she said. "We are extremely thankful." 

Jepsen quits concert

Jepsen quits concert, As soon as Carly Rae Jepsen found out that the Boy Scouts of America bans gay members, she didn't waste time pulling out of the association's National Scout Jamboree concert where she was scheduled to sing this summer. The Call Me Maybe singer said in a statement that she will always support the LBGT community.

    "As an artist who believes in equality for all people, I will not be participating in the Boy Scouts of America Jamboree this summer," Jepsen said. "I always have and will continue to support the LGBT community on a global level and stay informed on the ever-changing landscape in the ongoing battle for gay rights in this country and across the globe."

She also told MTV News that she is hoping that her decision helps the Boy Scouts change their stance on the issue.

    "I mean, it was sort of one of those things that I kind of have my opinions about, and everyone's entitled to their own, but it wasn't necessarily something that I felt comfortable backing once I learned more about it," she said. "And that being said here's hoping they make the right decision and I'm praying that moves like this will help."

Jepsen isn't the only artist that pulled out of the summer festival. Train was also scheduled to perform at the Jamboree and pulled out because of the association's ban on gay members. However, they said they would gladly return if the Boy Scouts reversed the ban.

Despite the drop outs, a spokesperson for the Boy Scouts of America said the show will still go on.

    "We appreciate everyone's right to express an opinion and remain focused on delivering a great Jamboree program for our Scouts," the spokesperson said.

Seacrest Hough split, Split after almost 3 years

Seacrest Hough split, Split after almost 3 years, After dating for more than two years, Ryan Seacrest and Julianne Hough have decided to take a break and are living apart, sources close to the couple confirm to PEOPLE.

The sources maintain that busy work schedules proved to be a great challenge for them both, although they are still in regular contact and remain friends.

Reps for Hough and Seacrest declined to comment.

The American Idol host and media mogul, 38, and former Dancing with the Stars pro and actress, 24, have spoken candidly in the past about juggling career and a relationship.

"It's a hard thing to do, especially when you're so caught up in your work and bettering yourself," Hough recently told PARADE. "I think at the end of the day you have to find a balance with what's really important."

After ringing in the new year, the duo enjoyed a romantic getaway in St. Bart's days later.

Seacrest Hough split

Seacrest Hough split, TV host Ryan Seacrest and actress Julianne Hough have reportedly split, a source told People magazine.

TV host Ryan Seacrest and actress Julianne Hough have reportedly split, a source told People magazine.

After two years together, Ryan Seacrest and Julianne Hough have broken up.

According to People magazine, the “American Idol” host, 38, and actress, 24, have decided to live apart and take a break from their relationship.

Ryan Seacrest and Julianne Hough reportedly broke up because of their busy work schedules.

The culprit for the split? Busy work schedules that kept the two of them apart. An insider noted that the parting was an amicable one and the former couple is still in touch.

It's been a tough spring for Hough. The “Footloose” star recently had $100,000 worth of jewelry stolen from her parked car. The missing bling in question happened to be expensive gifts from Seacrest.

RELATED: JULIANNE HOUGH SUFFERS A GOLDEN GLOBES WARDROBE MALFUNCTION

For his part, Seacrest was noticeably silent on the question of an upcoming wedding with Hough earlier this month, dodging queries about his love life.

Dixie Chick Goes Solo

Dixie Chick Goes Solo, Natalie Maines is back in the music business.Ten years after she and her fellow Dixie Chicks were punished by country radio for speaking out against a war and a U.S. president, Maines is preparing to release a solo record.

On Wednesday night at Austin City Limits Live, a venue in downtown Austin, Maines performed in its entirety "Mother," the album she will release on May 12. The title track is her cover of the Pink Floyd song from "The Wall" album.....kansascity.

She also covers the Jeff Buckley song "Lover You Should Have Come Over," "Without You," a track off a solo album by Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam, and "I'd Run Away" by the Jayhawks.

She brought with her a five-piece band, including lap-steel virtuoso Ben Harper, who produced "Mother" and whose presence was barely acknowledged until late in the set, when Maines introduced him.

It was the second performance of her new music (she performed in Los Angeles in February), and Maines seemed to be feeling a little pressure. Seven years have passed since the Dixie Chicks released an album and almost three since they have toured (they opened for the Eagles in summer 2010).

With the Chicks, Maines was typically an energetic spitfire, a brash lead singer with plenty to say and lots of wisecracks. She still has a powerful, agile and arresting voice, but her stage personae Wednesday night was polite and reserved. At times, she seemed a little nervous. She had little to say between songs and when she did it was brief. She had lyrics nearby on a music stand, but didn't seem to rely on them much.

She is almost not recognizable, either. Unlike her platinum blond days with the Chicks, Maines hair these days is dark and short, cut in style that almost exaggerates Justin Bieber's.

There was no mention of the Chicks, and she didn't play any of their songs, though she did perform "Come Cryin' to Me," which she co-wrote with her fellow Chicks, Martie McGuire and Emily Robison. She also performed "Free Life," a track she co-wrote with Dan Wilson of Semisonic about the West Memphis Three and one of the better tracks on "Mother."

The music from "Mother" is a mix of blues, rock and soul. Little of it resembles anything in the Chicks' catalog, which seems to be an inherent intent. It's all straightforward, generic in places, and its primary virtue is Maines' voice, which is still one of the best in the business.

The set ended with a track called "Take It On Faith." For that one, she was joined by her father, pedal steel ace Lloyd Maines. By song's end, he and Harper were engaged in a prolonged, wild-eyed lap steel/pedal steel jam that produced the loudest outburst of the night from a crowd of about 600 or so.

In the end, it was good to hear Maines live again and in such great voice, but this set was also a reminder of how much music, especially country music, misses her other band.

'Hot for Teacher' lawsuit

'Hot for Teacher' lawsuit, A man suspended from a Detroit-area university after writing about his attraction to teachers in a class journal sued the school Friday for $2.2 million and four lost credits, claiming his free-speech rights were violated.

Joseph Corlett, 57, a home builder who enrolled in college because of the weak economy, said he was an A-student in a writing class at Oakland University in Rochester until he submitted a journal in 2011 titled "Hot For Teacher," the name of a song by the rock band Van Halen.

Corlett compared his female instructor to Ginger, a sultry movie starlet character on the 1960s TV show "Gilligan's Island." He feared being distracted and said, "I'll never learn a thing." He said another teacher who was pregnant was "hot, and not just from baking the bun in her oven."

The teacher informed an Oakland dean after reading the journal for the first time. Officials said Corlett's writings violated a policy against intimidation or harassment and last year barred him for three terms, through winter 2013. The university said he must undergo counseling if he wants to return as a student.

In an interview, Corlett, who now lives in Sarasota, Fla., said he's fighting for his civil rights.

"When you get past the titillation, you've got to look into what's really going on here," he said. "It's academic freedom or no academic freedom. We're all collectively dumbed when speech is suppressed or challenged."

Oakland spokesman David Groves said the school doesn't comment on lawsuits.

Corlett said students in the English 380 class were told to write "raw things, a personal diary that maybe we wouldn't want anyone to read." He said the teacher had no objection to his earlier work, which earned an A, an essay about accidentally seeing women's breasts.

"There is no constitutional protection against being offended," Corlett said. "And while I am sympathetic to anyone's feelings, I repeatedly asked for instruction. I was repeatedly told there were no topics that were out of bounds."

Corlett was removed from the writing class by two police officers after an Oakland administrator forgot to tell him that he was barred from attending while his status as a student was under review.

Attorney Alari Adams said Corlett is seeking $2.2 million for mental anguish and the embarrassment of being kicked out of school.

Palin mocks Obama and Rove

Former GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin mocked President Obama, GOP consultant Karl Rove and the mainstream media in a folksy speech to a gathering of conservative activists outside Washington Saturday.

During her address to the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, Palin accused Obama of failing to lead, instead maintaining a permanent campaign approach of demonizing the opposition.

True leadership, she said, means "ending the poisonous practice of treating members of different social, ethnic and religious groups as different electorates, pandered to with different promises." If all men are created equal, as the Declaration of Independence states, Palin said, then there are "no Hispanic issues or African-American issues or women's issues — there are only American issues."

The former Alaska governor also mocked Obama's proposals for stricter gun rules, tying the issue to conspiracy theories about the president's own citizenship. "More background checks? Dandy idea, Mr. President — should have started with yours."

But Palin also turned on Republican leaders such as Rove, who President George W. Bush once called the architect of his electoral victories. Rove has recently said Republicans need to choose candidates who are more "electable" and less ideologically contentious.

"The last thing we need is Washington, D.C., vetting our candidates," Palin said. "The architects can head on back to the great Lone Star state and put their names on some ballot."

Palin's speech was full of the kind of down-home humor and references to her life as a "hockey mom from Wasilla" that made her a star during the 2008 election season. Her biggest applause line Saturday was a double-entendre about the Christmas gifts she exchanged with her husband, Todd. She said he bought her a gun locker to put on a truck, and she bought him a gun. So, "he's got the rifle, I've got the rack," she said.

While the crowd stood and cheered at the line from a country song, Palin took a Big Gulp soda from behind the lectern and sipped from a straw, noting that it was OK since New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was not around. Bloomberg, an independent, has tried to ban the sale of large-size sugary sodas in the Big Apple, a move that drew outrage from the soft drink industry and civil libertarians who charged it was an overreach of authority.

Palin's selection as the GOP vice presidential nominee in 2008 ignited the Republican base, and her speech at the Republican convention — her first major national appearance — made her an instant hero to conservatives. But during the campaign she appeared at times confused or unprepared, and Democrats pounced on her gaffes.

After the campaign, Palin remained a force in Republican politics, and in several 2010 campaigns, her endorsement was critical in raising the public profile and the fundraising efforts of conservative candidates. Freshman Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who was scheduled to give the keynote address at CPAC Saturday night, introduced Palin on Saturday, saying, "I would not be in the U.S. Senate today if it were not for Gov. Sarah Palin."

In 2010, Palin signed on as a commentator with Fox News, but that relationship ended at the beginning of this year. She has since seen her public profile wane.

She toyed with the idea of a possible presidential campaign in 2012, but ultimately decided not to run.

Toyota recall

Toyota recall, Toyota Motor Corp was recalling 209,000 FJ Cruiser SUVs because their front seatbelt retractors could fall off.

FJ Cruisers from the 2007 through 2013 model years are included in the recall.

Toyota said the driver and front passenger seatbelts are mounted on the vehicle’s rear doors. If the doors are closed forcefully over a period of time, cracks can form in the door panel around the seatbelt retractor and the retractor can become detached.

Toyota said it has received no reports of injuries due to the defect.

Toyota said Friday that will notify owners soon by mail. The company will repair the vehicles for free.

Poker champ arrested, FossilMan busted


Poker champ arrested, World Series of Poker champ Greg Raymer -- aka the FossilMan -- has been busted for trying to bury his bone ... after allegedly soliciting a prostitute online.

11:13 AM PT -- Despite initial reports, cops say the sting did NOT involve "male" prostitutes ... but rather prostitutes of the female variety.

A rep for the Wake Forest PD in North Carolina says Raymer was popped at a Wake Forest hotel on Wednesday.

Police say the 48-year-old poker legend was one of six men who responded to an advertisement posted by an undercover cop on a website frequented by prostitutes. The men have since been released on $1,000 bond.

According to Raymer's website, he is currently married.

Raymer -- famous for his lizard-eye hologram glasses -- won the 2004 World Series of Poker main event. He reportedly owns a nearby NC house valued at nearly $1.6 million.

Bill Walton ESPN joke

Bill Walton ESPN joke, It's the Pac 12 Tournament and Bill Walton is ending the year with a bang.  The redhead has had a glorious return to the broadcast booth working games for the Pac 12 Network and ESPN this year after being sidelined due to health reasons.  Walton was in rare form today, even by his Grateful Dead infused high standards, so much so that the Pac 12 actually sent a press release with some of his best quotes from the early action.  But those were nothing compared to what Walton said coming out of commercial with the Pac 12 mascots coming out of a limousine.  It was worthy of a double take, a spit take, and any other _____ take you could muster.  Bill Walton made a joke about being in the limosuine with ESPN's shiny new NFL analyst Ray Lewis, who just happens to have a bit of history with limos:

"I was way in the back with Ray Lewis and it was unbelievable how much fun, oh my gosh, how many people were in there!"

Dave Pasch's deadpan reaction may be the perfect complement to the clip.

If Bill Simmons can get kicked off Twitter for a few days for a tepid critique of Skip Bayless, what's going to happen to Walton for that punchline about Ray Lewis?  Better get the #FreeWalton hashtag ready as a preemptive strike.

UPDATE: And fittingly enough, Walton also made a Bill Simmons joke after Dave Pasch suggested he'd get in trouble for only hocking Southwest Airlines.  Again, Pasch plays his role as the straight man excellently.  I'll have to check the record books, but I think Bill Walton may have just put together the greatest half in Awful Announcing history.

We'll provide updates throughout the evening to see if Walton keeps this performance up.  Of course, he could also be escorted out of Las Vegas by ESPN security at any moment.

UPDATE: Here's some of Walton's best quotes from the second half...

"Fans beyond description, dancing angels of mercy, what more could you ask for. It's all happening."

Dave Pasch says working with Walton this weekend will age him 8 years. Walton: "Your wife's been calling me."

Pasch: "How much of that is instinctual as a shot blocker, how much of it is teaching?"
Walton: "100 percent of both."

"Lorenzo Romar just pulling his hair out!" (Romar is bald)

Walton on Arsalan Kazemi, "His parents own a candy factory four hours south of Tehran, oh my gosh how sweet it is."

"Both teams riding quasars all the way to the top of the mountain and the promised land."

Walton: "So many things here have defied rational thought."
Pasch: "You're not kidding."

San Antonio FD Receives First Baby under Texas Baby Moses Law

A young woman left her two-hour-old infant with firefighters at San Antonio Fire Station 29, located in the 800 block of Hot Wells Blvd.

According to Battalion Chief Russell Johnson, the woman, who appeared to be in her 20s, knocked on the door and told firefighters she couldn't care for the newborn.

The baby girl was immediately transported to Santa Rosa Children's Hospital and appears to be in good health.

This is the first baby dropped off at Fire Station 29 under Texas' Baby Moses law, which permits parents to leave unharmed infants up to 60 days old at a fire station or hospital with complete immunity. Child Protective Services then takes custody of the baby.

"We just want to make sure everybody understands... if you're a young mother or young father that can't handle a baby... you're welcome to bring it by the fire station or emergency room and there's no questions asked," said Johnson.

Dorian Electra Interview: Libertarian at heart but not as a label

Dorian Electra Interview: Libertarian at heart but not as a label, An earlier article, Dorian Electra: "I don’t call myself a libertarian at all anymore" speculated on why a teenage singing phenom who launched her career with love lyrics for Friedrich Hayek would later disavow her libertarian label.

She agreed to an interview after saying "I need to think very carefully about how I articulate my thoughts on this particular topic."

Now Dorian Electra Fridkin Gomberg offers those "articulated thoughts" in this exclusive Libertarian News Examiner interview.

Do you considered yourself to be a libertarian?

"I’m against the use of force, intimidation, fraud. Ideally, I’d love to live in a totally peaceful world, but unfortunately, we live in a world where coercion is often unavoidable. That being said, I’d like to live in a world where coercion is minimized as much as possible.


"FA$T CA$H: Easy Credit & the Economic Crash" - (Music Video by Dorian Electra)

"I have called myself a 'libertarian' in the past before, but in my experience, I’ve never found political labels to be very helpful in communicating with people. They can be off-putting and over-simplifying. Not labeling myself has opened more people up to dialogue with me about the actual ideas, rather than assume they know what I believe because of a label.

"My ideas and beliefs are constantly developing, and this point in my life I think that what is most beneficial for my intellectual development is to expose myself to as many viewpoints as possible instead of prematurely closing the door to potentially valuable insights."

Besides F.A. Hayek are you familiar with Ron Paul, Gary Johnson, Libertarian Party, Reason magazine, Ayn Rand, Voluntaryism...

"I’m familiar with everything you’ve listed. I tend not to pay too much attention to politics, to be honest. I admire Ron Paul for being principled and consistent, which is (unfortunately) rare for politicians.

"I saw Gary Johnson speak in the third-party debate held in Chicago and it was inspiring to hear him, Jill Stein (Green Party) and Rocky Anderson (Justice Party) agree on so many important issues, taking bold stances that no mainstream politician would take (e.g. on civil liberties issues, ending corporate privilege and abuses of power, and against the war on drugs).

"I think Voluntaryism is an interesting philosophy, but I’m more interested in figuring out practical means of establishing voluntary forms of governance in the world we live in today, rather than in strictly philosophizing. This, in general, sums up my attitude towards libertarian ideas.

"I think that, ideally, we should try to minimize the use of force against citizens wherever possible. But my commitment to libertarian ideas extends only so far as they are practically useful for improving the situation TODAY. I think it is often counter-productive to have an excessively rigid attachment to philosophical principles which stands in the way of productive political discourse with anyone who does not share your ideology.

"The world is incredibly complex. Libertarianism is very good at seeing how this is true in some areas (See: Hayek). But with issues regarding morality and policy-making (in the CURRENT situation, not in an ideal libertarian utopia) it tends to view the world from a black-and-white perspective. This often blinds libertarianism to the complexities that would cast doubt upon its own principles."

Watch her video and then subscribe to Libertarian News Examiner so you won't miss Dorian Electra Interview Part 2.

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Second Portland man sentenced in mortgage fraud scheme

Second Portland man sentenced in mortgage fraud scheme, Geoffrey Montani, 36, of Portland, Ore., was sentenced March 15, 2013 by U.S. District Judge Robert E. Jones to 15 months in prison for wire fraud in connection with a mortgage fraud scheme. Montani’s co-conspirator, Kenneth Jones, 50, also of Portland, received the same sentence on March 7, 2013 in a separate hearing. In addition to the prison term, each was ordered to pay over $1.4 million in restitution.

One other participant in the scheme who provided “straw buyers” for Montani and Jones, Marty Folwick, was convicted and sentenced to 63 months in prison in 2008

Montani and Jones bought and resold residential houses in the Portland metropolitan area from mid-2005 through April 2007. Instead of attempting to sell these houses to legitimate buyers, they chose to sell to the “straw buyers” who were promised a cut of the profits for the use of their name and good credit records.

The scheme, in essence, worked as follows: Montani and Jones purchased residential houses in the Portland area with money provided by Montani’s father, Stephen Montani, and other “hard money” investors. In some cases, remodeling was done on the house after purchase. Rather than listing the house for resale through a realtor or other traditional means, Montani and Jones contacted Folwick, told him they had a property for sale at a set price and solicited him to produce a straw-buyer for the property in exchange for a kickback following closing. These straw-buyers had no intent to live in the property or pay the monthly mortgage, but they allowed (or were duped into allowing) their name and credit score to be used on the mortgage application, on the false promise that they would become successful real estate investors. Once a straw-buyer was identified, a mortgage application was prepared by Montani and Jones or their associates for the straw-buyer to sign.

Montani and Jones knew that each application contained false information and would be submitted to a lender for approval based on the false information in the application. In a number of cases, Montani and Jones created false supporting documentation for inclusion with the application. Once the mortgage loan was approved, the property was sold to the straw-buyer; thereafter Montani and Jones paid off the hard money loan and divided the significant profits between themselves and others. In every case, the property subsequently fell into foreclosure, causing losses to the mortgage lender. The losses on the 37 properties identified by the government for prosecution totaled $1.9 million dollars.