Tony Gonzalez salary: Tony may return to Falcons

At the time Atlanta Falcons fell about 10 yards short of a Super Bowl berth recent January, it was appearing as though future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez had played the final game of his 16-year career.

Now, the Falcons are becoming increasingly hopeful that Gonzo might not be gone after all.
Tony Gonzalez helped the Falcons go 13-3 and make the NFC title game last season.
Tony Gonzalez helped the Falcons go 13-3 and make the NFC title game last season.
According to multiple team sources, the Falcons are cautiously optimistic that Gonzalez, the second-leading receiver in NFL history, will return for another potential title run in 2013. Sources close to Gonzalez, an unrestricted free agent, said he is contemplating a return at the right price, provided he can miss some or all of training camp this summer.

"He will come back if they pay him $7 million and he doesn't have to do training camp," said one Falcons player familiar with Gonzalez's thinking.

Another team source added, "If we offer him the money, he'll most likely be back for one more. He'll most likely be looking to miss training camp, though."

A high-ranking Falcons official indicated the team would not likely let either of those issues become an impediment to a deal. Gonzalez, who had a $3.9 million base salary in 2012 and earned a $1 million roster bonus, is still productive (he caught 93 passes last season and shined in the postseason) and is known for his phenomenal physical conditioning.

"The money is there," a source close to Gonzalez said. "Working out the days he can miss is the biggest holdup."

Though Gonzalez will technically be free to sign with other teams as of Tuesday, when unrestricted free agency begins, both sides seem willing to proceed deliberately. The Falcons are focused on retaining their own free agents, as evidenced by Saturday's re-signing of safety William Moore to a reported five-year, $32 million deal. The team also re-signed guard Garrett Reynolds for two years on Saturday.

Offensive tackle Sam Baker and cornerback Brent Grimes are Atlanta's other free-agent priorities.

The Falcons are strongly considering drafting Gonzalez's successor in April, with former Notre Dame tight end Tyler Eifert and former Stanford tight end Zac Ertz among the possible selections in the first round. (Atlanta holds the 30th overall pick.) However, even if the team addresses the position in the draft, the Falcons' brass likely would remain highly motivated to retain Gonzalez for at least another season.

In January, Gonzalez became highly emotional after experiencing the first playoff victory of his storied career. At the time, Gonzalez stood by his assertion that he was "95 percent sure" 2012 would be his final season.

North Korea has cut off Hotline: Redcross with South Korea

North Korea has cut off: Redcross with South Korea
North Korea on Friday cutted off a Red Cross hotline with South Korea as it initiated its war of words against Seoul and Washington in response to a military drill in the South and U.N. sanctions imposed for its recent nuclear test.

The North had threatened to cut off the hotline on March 11 if the United States and South Korea did not abandon their joint military exercise.

The Red Cross hotline is used to communicate between Seoul and Pyongyang which do not have diplomatic relations.

"We called at 9 a.m. and there was no response," a government official from South Korea said. The line is tested each day.

Pyongyang has also threatened to cut off a hotline with U.N. forces in South Korea, at the border "truce village" of Pammunjom.

Tensions on the Korean peninsula have risen since the North conducted a third nuclear test on February 12, prompting new U.N. sanctions.

South Korea and U.S. forces are conducting large-scale military drills until the end of April, while the North is also gearing up for a massive state-wide military exercise.

North Korea has accused the United States of using the military drills in South Korea as a launch pad for a nuclear war and has threatened to scrap the armistice with Washington that ended hostilities in the 1950-53 Korean War.

The North has threatened a nuclear strike on the United States, but such a threat has been dismissed as rhetoric by analysts, as the North does not have the military capacity to reach the United States.

The North is viewed as more likely to stage some kind of attack along a disputed sea border, if it does anything at all, rather than risk a war with South Korea and the United States, which it would lose, according to most military assessments.

Nice and unpredictable world of the Great American Ostrich Races

Well It may seem hard tobelieve it but this sport of ostrich racing has a a very long history.

A statue of Egyptian queen Arsinoe II riding an ostrich was discovered in an ancient tomb, and racing the birds is a fairly common practice in parts of Africa.

That's not to say it's easy. Ostriches can reach speeds of over 43 mph and their long legs can cover up to 16ft in a single stride.

When ostrich racing featured in Disney fantasy film Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time the filmmakers had to hire Moroccan horse jockeys as stuntmen.

In the U.S., the Chandler Ostrich Festival in Arizona celebrated its 25th year this weekend. Ostrich racing is a major part of the festival and the runs were as eventful and crazy as usual.

As the festival website asks: 'When was the last time you witnessed an ostrich race? If you haven’t yet experienced it, you must make it a point to attend this hilarious and unpredictable event. Ostrich races will captivate audiences with their crazy riders and unexpected animal behavior.'
Rivals: Dustin Murley, left, and Jessey Sisson, right, race on their ostriches during the annual Ostrich Festival in Chandler, Arizona March 10, 2013
Rivals: Dustin Murley, left, and Jessey Sisson, right, race on their ostriches during the annual Ostrich Festival in Chandler, Arizona March 10, 2013

Going: Dustin Murley in the process of falling off his charge
Going: Dustin Murley in the process of falling off his charge

Going: Murley gets closer to the ground
Going: Murley gets closer to the ground

Video: Chariots of Fire Ostrich Race, March 9, 2013
Gone: Murley is unseated by his ostrich
Gone: Murley is unseated by his ostrich

Jessey Sisson sits on his ostrich as he prepares to race
Jessey Sisson sits on his ostrich as he prepares to race

Sisson trots about on his bird
Sisson trots about on his bird

Young spectators looked puzzled during the Ostrich Festival
Young spectators looked puzzled during the Ostrich Festival

Ostrich jockeys examine the birds in their pens
Ostrich jockeys examine the birds in their pens

Riders and their ostriches leave the gate
Riders and their ostriches leave the gate

Hater app: Negative Alternative to Social Media

Hater
All the popular Social networks such as Facebook and Instagram are intended to help users share their lives, but Hate App founder Jake Banks believes the language of "likes" used on these services forces us to be overly positive and restricts our ability to be ourselves. That's why he decided to develop an alternative social networking app called Hater, which is intended for sharing all the things you don't like.

"It's really an answer to everything out there in social media. All you can do is 'like' things," Banks told Mashable. "I don't want to be the guy pretending to be someone I'm not. I want to be real and say, 'I'm sitting in traffic and I hate this.'" While you can post a comment like that on Facebook or Twitter, Banks' contention is that providing a dedicated community for dislikes frees up users to re-think the type of posts they share and vent a bit.

Banks spent more than a decade directing commercials and running a New York production company, which also developed apps for clients in recent years. As a result, he got interested in developing apps on the side and started brainstorming a social app that might stand out from the many others on the market. "I was looking at the social world and thinking, What's missing?'" Banks decided the answer to that question was Hater. So six months ago, he sold off his company and devoted himself to working on Hater full time.

The resulting app, which launched on the iPhone Friday just in time for SXSW, and will be available on Android in the next couple months, looks a lot like Instagram. You can take a picture or upload a photo from your phone, share it to the Hater community with a caption, view a feed of other posts from the Hater community and offer feedback. Of course, the intention for Hater is very different than Instagram. With Hater, you might take a picture of yourself waiting in line or stuck in a traffic jam to show how much you dislike it.
hater app
Hater's app also gives users the option to pull an image of something they hate from other sites through the app and to post to the service using an alter ego. "It's a little more self-deprecating and a little more fun," Banks says of the app. "You're sitting at work, working a 12-hour shift and you go on Facebook and you see your friend from high school is on his third vacation of the month, and he's taking pictures of his food and all that. Now you can snapshot it and Hate it."

This isn't the first app to take a negative spin on sharing online. Enemygraph, a Facebook app that launched last year, let users declare enemies rather than friends on the social network. But Banks says Hater doesn't just want people to be negative for the sake of being negative. He plans to roll out a feature in the future called Hate For Good, which will let users "create awareness" for things that need changing simply by sharing the fact that they dislike it.

"It doesnt have to be so negative," he says. "You might hate something so much you want to change it, which is the complete opposite of what happens when you Like something."

Banks also has hopes of eventually turning the Hater brand into a clothing line and perhaps even opening up some storefronts. For right now, though, Banks is focused on building up the app's community at SXSW. Banks will be at Startup Village in Austin for the event.

Kristen Stewart Mother Jules starts Directorial Debut With K-11

Kristen Stewart's Mother Jules Stewart Makes Directorial Debut With K-11


If you've ever wondered where Kristen Stewart gets that charming edge from, just ask her mother! Seasoned Hollywood script-supervisor Jules Stewart makes her directorial debut with K-11, a gripping prison drama that's a far cry from her daughter's Twilight Saga blockbusters.

"I can't watch Spider-Man anymore," Jules tells Us Weekly. "I just can't watch six variations of the same thing -- it just makes me a little crazy." Instead, Jules sought out to make a film that she hoped would make people think a little bit more about something unique and different.

Set inside a section of the Los Angeles County Jail reserved for LGBT inmates, K-11 explores the politics of race and gender equality through Raymond Saxx (Goran Visnjik), a businessman who is forced to deal with violence, crooked cops and a manipulative transgendered inmate named Mousey (Kate Del Castillo) on his quest to escape K-11, all while piecing together how he ended up there in the first place.
Kristen Stewart attends the "On The Road" premiere at SVA Theater on December 13, 2012.
Kristen Stewart attends the "On The Road" premiere at SVA Theater on December 13, 2012.
"In the dorm, there's no racial issues -- they're all gay or transgender," Jules says. "That's what holds them together. So race is not an issue, which was a big message in this film. . . It doesn't matter what color you are, everybody is the same."

The film also stars Portia Doubleday as Butterfly, a role that Kristen had originally attached herself to six years ago while she was filming the first Twilight movie. The unexpected success of the franchise took Kristen's career in a completely different direction.

"She kept working and she kept working and she kept working," Jules explains. "And she got really big and we were still really small and I was like, 'Go! Go do Snow White, please, go make those big films honey, that's wonderful!'"

Kristen does have a small part in the film as a secretary who picks up a very important phone call. Though Jules stands by her decision to recast her daughter's original role, the filmmaker still believes that Kristen would have done the part justice. "Kristen has a dark side," she tells Us. "Kristen has the edge -- thank god, right?"

K-11 will be released on March 15 in 15 cities across the U.S. and will be available On Demand through local cable companies. Visit there website for more information on where K-11 is playing.

Bieber cancels concert: Justin Concert was in Portugal

Justin Bieber cancels concert
Justin Bieber cancels concert
Justin Bieber has canceled one of his two scheduled concert shows this week in Portugal "due to unforeseen circumstances" ... this according to the website for the venue.

Bieber was scheduled to play the Pavilhao Atlantico in Lisbon on March 11 and March 12, but the site now says the second show is canceled.

A statement posted on the site (and translated thanks to the good folks at Google) reads, "Due to unforeseen circumstances, Justin Bieber was forced to cancel the second performance in Portugal, March 12."

It continues, "The Canadian singer is eager to play for the Portuguese fans on March 11. Holders of tickets valid for March 12 should contact the respective place of purchase to receive a refund within 30 days of the date of the scheduled concert, which ends April 11."

It's unclear what the unforeseen circumstances are, but he was hospitalized last week after collapsing backstage (though that wouldn't explain why he's canceling the SECOND show).

He also tweeted earlier today simply, "#sundayfunday."

Mandy Moore Exits: Star cast of Comdey pilot

Add caption
American Lady Mandy Moore left the Star cast of the ABC comedy pilot Pulling. The under the works TV comedy series is based on the British series that followed three dysfunctional women in their 30s and aired in the U.K. from 2006-2009. The U.S. version is being shot on a single-camera by director Jason Moore (Pitch Perfect.) Lee Eisenberg and Gene Stupnitsky, who also wrote and produced Bad Teacher starring Justin Timberlake and Cameron Diaz, are behind the script and serve as Pulling's executive producers.

The reason may be behind Moore's exit is due to casting issues. The Tangled star seemed to be rather understanding of the whole ordeal. “Many things change quickly as a pilot moves into production,” Moore said. “And in this case, Lee and Gene moved the character in a different direction, it was clear this wasn’t right for me. Rather than jeopardize the show, I asked to step aside. They and ABC were very accommodating, and wish them all the best in the fall. It’s a terrific show that worked so well in the UK, I hope it gets the audience it deserves here.”

“Mandy is a pro, and has been very patient and accommodating with us,” Pulling producers, the same guys behind the film Bad Teacher, said. “As we moved closer to production, it was clear we needed to go in a different direction for the character, and Mandy agreed to do what was best for the show. She’s an immensely gifted actress and we hope to have the pleasure of working with her again.”

Michelle Obama going strong, What could be next?

First lady Michelle Obama champions one of her key causes — fighting childhood obesity — Friday at a summit held in Washington by the Partnership for a Healthier America. She is the group's honorary chairwoman.
First lady Michelle Obama champions one of her key causes — fighting childhood obesity — Friday at a summit held in Washington by the Partnership for a Healthier America. She is the group's honorary chairwoman.
She had danced on TeleVision with Jimmy Fallon. She's dropped in at the Oscars, worked out on the White House lawn, sparkled at state dinners, become a fashion trendsetter. She's even gotten Americans to think more about what they eat. What's next for first lady Michelle Obama?

From her new bangs-and-bob hairstyle to her dance moves to her couture gowns, people can't stop talking about her — and she kind of can't be avoided. She's a master of Twitter, a star of TV talk shows, a crowd-pleaser wherever she goes.

But is she overexposed? Are we going to see even more of her on our screens in the next four years?

Granted, she did not attend Saturday night's Gridiron Dinner with the president and the Washington press corps. But no less than Saturday Night Live is joking about her ubiquity, teasing in a recent skit that the sequester budget cuts would force her to make "four television appearances a week, down from her usual 75."

Obama, who just turned 49, is fully aware of the intensity of attention to everything she does. "My bangs set off a national conversation," Obama told reporters on a recent trip, after she had joked that the bangs were her "midlife crisis." "We've got a lot of talking going on. Everybody's kitchen-table conversation is now accessible to everybody else. It's absolutely not surprising."

According to the White House, she and her staff are in the midst of strategizing how the next four years might differ, or might not, from her first term as FLOTUS, generally hailed as a rousing success with her clever blending of conventional and unconventional.

"I can't think of too much to criticize," says Anita McBride, former chief of staff to Laura Bush and now director of first-lady studies at American University in Washington. "Is she pushing the envelope? Not for her. I think she's clearly found her footing."

It's not as if Obama had a lot of training. A lawyer and non-profit executive, she was not a longtime political wife, never lived in Washington, didn't do politics, didn't even much want her husband to run for president.Syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker writes that Obama is having fun as the star of her own movie. "She isn't just breaking the mold; she's shattering the good china. The Madonna of first ladies, she is emerging as an iconoclastic, self-reinventing woman who clearly doesn't mind shaking the firmament."

Since 2009, her East Wing has undergone typical staff upheavals: She is on her third chief of staff, her second press secretary, her second communications director and her third social secretary (who is, for the first time, a man).

But she adapted to the undefined job of first lady like a pro, say those who have watched her. Polls show she's become one of the most popular, admired women in the world, able to persuade kids to eat their vegetables or make an unknown fashion designer like Jason Wu a global star.

"She's been a tremendous success. I don't know of any who had more success with a White House initiative," says Myra Gutin, a dean of first-lady historians and professor of communication at Rider University in New Jersey.

Obama has done all the traditional, popular first-lady things — adopted causes, hosted the grand, good and glittery at the White House, raised millions for her husband. But she has gone, repeatedly, where no first lady has gone before, especially on social media, which largely didn't exist for her predecessors, and on TV, which did.

She has embraced media in ways her predecessors did not. At the same time, she maintains a loyal, non-leaking, highly controlled operation that is at least as non-transparent as the White House press corps says the West Wing is. (Except no one is complaining about it.)
Michelle Obama goes through the "Evolution of Mom-Dancing" with host Jimmy Fallon during a 'Late Night' appearance in February.

Mandy Moore exits: new comedy pilot Pulling

Mandy Moore Exits comedy pilot Pulling
Mandy Moore Exits comedy pilot Pulling
Mandy Moore is making headlines after leaving ABC’s Popular comedy pilot Pulling. The project, written by Lee Eisenberg and Gene Stupnitsky and directed by Jason Moore, revolves around three dysfunctional women in their 30s living their lives the way they want, even if society tells them they should have it all figured out by this point. Moore was to play one of them, Louise, who is optimistic and desperate to snag a husband. Moore was the first actor cast in a major role on the pilot, based on the praised 2006 British series. June Diane Raphael was cast as the lead and supporting actors were added. Word is those castings changed the dynamic, and Moore’s character evolved, leading to Moore’s exit. “Mandy is a pro, and has been very patient and accommodating with us,” Pulling producers said. “As we moved closer to production, it was clear we needed to go in a different direction for the character, and Mandy agreed to do what was best for the show. She’s an immensely gifted actress and we hope to have the pleasure of working with her again.”

Indeed, ABC has been very high on Moore. The network produced a comedy pilot starring the actress last season and earlier this season bought a Rich Appel comedy project she was attached to with a put pilot commitment. “Many things change quickly as a pilot moves into production,” Moore said. “And in this case, Lee and Gene moved the character in a different direction, it was clear this wasn’t right for me. Rather than jeopardize the show, I asked to step aside. They and ABC were very accommodating, and wish them all the best in the fall. It’s a terrific show that worked so well in the UK, I hope it gets the audience it deserves here.”

Roman Church thinks Europe slipping from its hands


People gather at St. Peter's Square
People gather at St. Peter's Square at the Vatican ahead of the cardinals' conclave this week. (March 10, 2013)
VATICAN CITY — The timing said it all.

A smiling Pope Benedict XVI had just wrapped up an official visit to Portugal in May 2010, during which he praised Catholic organizations striving to protect families based on "the indissoluble marriage between a man and a woman."

But barely 72 hours after the pontiff flew home, the president of Portugal declared that he would sign a bill allowing gay and lesbian couples to wed. With Spain having granted such rights five years earlier, the move turned the entire Iberian Peninsula, historically a Catholic stronghold, into an unlikely hitching post for homosexuals.

"That shows the importance of the pope's views, of the Catholic Church's views, on same-sex marriage in terms of domestic politics," Paulo Corte-Real, a gay rights activist and economics professor, recalled wryly.

More than just an embarrassment, the turn of events was emblematic of the fact that the Roman Catholic Church, once a mighty force on its home continent, is weaker in modern Europe than ever before, its influence ebbing, its privileged status increasingly called into question.

The now-retired Benedict spent much of his eight-year papacy trying to revive Catholicism here on its home turf. But the cardinals now assembled at the Vatican to pick his successor face a grim reality: The campaign has failed to reverse, or even just to halt, Europe's slide toward what church leaders regard as godless humanism.

Empty spaces in the pews abound. The clerical sex-abuse scandal has stripped the church of much of its credibility and moral authority in parts of Europe (and the United States as well). When it comes to high-profile social issues such as gay rights and abortion, the church has lost battle after battle.

For many Europeans, the relevance of the church, both for their personal and their public lives, is a thing of the past.

"The modern world and the Catholic Church are out of step," said Clifford Longley, a Catholic columnist and analyst in Britain. "The Catholic Church can try to re-evangelize by getting the modern world back into step with it, but I don't think that's going to work."

The church's declining fortunes in Europe pose tough choices to the cardinals gathering in their secretive conclave. Should they maintain the emphasis on shoring up the faith in the Vatican's backyard, or concentrate and increase their resources in places where the church is actually growing, such as Africa and Asia? Should they take an even more dramatic step (and a deep breath) and elect a new pope from one of those regions?

No clear favorite has emerged, at least in public discourse. But the composition of the College of Cardinals suggests that the new pontiff is more than likely to wind up being a white man in his 60s or 70s with the same conservative, orthodox views on religious doctrine and social issues as Benedict and the late John Paul II.

Europe, by contrast, is steadily becoming more ethnically and religiously heterogeneous and more socially liberal.

That divergence helps explain why, by most every quantitative measure, the Catholic Church has hit hard times in the region.

Weekly Mass attendance is at an all-time low in Western Europe. Only 1 in 5 Catholics in Spain report going to a service once a week. In Germany, it's 1 in 6, and fewer than 1 in 10 in France, according to research by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

"I'm Catholic. I was [educated] in a religious school," said molecular biologist Antonio Garcia, a 33-year-old Spaniard. "But my family never goes to church — only my grandmother."

In Europe's biggest countries, the number of baptized Catholics as a share of the overall population has dropped. Indeed, Europe was the only region of the world to witness a decline in the number of Catholics between 1990 and 2010, a period during which the global tally climbed nearly 30% to 1.2 billion adherents, according to Vatican statistics. The proportion of Catholics in Europe was just 23.8% in 2010, the lowest in memory.

The shrinking number of the spiritually devout in Europe has corresponded with a serious loss of temporal clout for the church, an institution that once exercised significant power in alliance with the state or even, in some cases, over and above it.

Catholics and non-Catholics alike have been disillusioned by factors that, critics warn, could fatally undermine the church's influence if it does not take steps to correct course.

The sex abuse scandal, with its reports of Vatican coverups and insensitive treatment of victims, has robbed the church of its moral standing in the eyes of many. In recent days, the only cardinals in Rome to speak out on the need for the global church to address the issue have been Americans, reinforcing the impression that the church hierarchy in Europe still refuses to acknowledge the severity of the problem.

At the same time, the Vatican's traditional teachings on family, gender and sexuality no longer seem to connect with the daily experience of many Europeans, who find official Catholic strictures on such matters as birth control and the role of women in the church retrograde and unfair.

To stick to the same dogma risks losing more adherents, said columnist Longley, but change is not on the horizon with the current crop of conservative-leaning cardinals.

"To some extent, they're prisoners of their own ideology," Longley said. "The Catholic Church seems so far away from where people are that discussion doesn't even start."

Nowhere is the retreat of Catholic influence seen more clearly than in the realm of gay rights.

Catholic leaders have routinely denounced same-sex marriage as a threat to society, organizing demonstrations against it and demanding that lawmakers shun measures to legalize it.

Yet Benedict's papacy was bookended with major defeats on the issue in countries with large Catholic populations. In 2005, shortly after he was named pope, Spain approved marriage equality, joining nations such as Denmark and Belgium. This year, as Benedict prepared his resignation announcement, both France and Britain introduced bills authorizing same-sex marriage. They are almost certain to become law.

Garcia, the Spanish molecular biologist, is marrying his British boyfriend in September. They're planning a big bash.

"I have a very conservative family, and I have quite a lot of religious friends. They accept [it] completely," Garcia said. "Spain is a very Catholic country, but at the same time it's very progressive."

No longer the unassailable institution of yore, the church in Spain is even finding its tax-exempt status questioned. Dozens of cash-strapped municipalities have decided to target church-owned properties being used for commercial purposes, not religious ones, and are demanding their share of the revenue.

"The case of a convent where the nuns sell sweets — that's very typical in Spain. We think that's an economic activity, for which tax must be paid," said Anselmo Avendaño, a practicing Catholic and a councilman in Alcala, a town outside Madrid that is $400 million in debt.

In Germany, Benedict's homeland, local bishops caused a stir last year when, backed by the Vatican, they warned of serious consequences for Catholics who opted out of paying a government-collected tax that goes to the church. Any parishioner who did so would no longer be allowed to take Communion, make confession or serve as a godparent.

Such moves have alienated many of the flock even as Benedict trotted from country to country trying to rejuvenate the faith in Europe.

His visits were met with enthusiasm by many devotees, but the effects often seemed ephemeral. To make Europe a successful mission field, his successor will have to fire up local parishes to take the initiative, said Santiago de la Cierva, a communications professor at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross in Rome.

"I don't think the pope alone will make the change," De la Cierva said. Papal visits are "really important for many Catholic institutions to recover the pride in being Catholic and the enthusiasm for being Catholic. But that alone doesn't work."

Raja Bell Released: NBA Options Now Limited

Raja Bell was released by the Utah Jazz
Raja Bell was released by the Utah Jazz
Raja Bell is released by the NBA Utah Jazz on Sunday after not playing for the team at all this NBA season.

The release my signal the end of the road for the 36-year-old guard, who will become an unrestricted free agent after the season. Because Raja Bell was released before the March 1 deadline, he will not be eligible for the playoffs.

Bell was known as a defensive-minded guard who was deft at three-pointers, but had trouble in Utah. He came into conflict with Utah coach Tyrone Corbin over playing time and did not play down the stretch last season or during the 2012 playoffs.

During the playoffs, Raja Bell called Corbin “unprofessional” and said he wouldn’t play for the Jazz again. Bell followed through, skipping out on training camp and not joining the team this year — a decision the Jazz agreed with.

Raja Bell said he would like to play in the NBA, and he has rumored to be joining the Lakers. The guard has a history with current Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni, who was his coach on the fast-paced Phoenix Suns teams of the mid 2000s. But the Lakers would likely balk at acquiring Bell this season because of his ineligibility for the playoffs, which will severely limit his ability to play in the NBA again this season.

Raja Bell averaged 6.4 points per game for the Jazz last season, but only played in 34 games.

Bell will receive the full amount of his contract and can sign with another team once he clears waivers. The Jazz had reportedly been trying to trade Bell or buy out his contract. Because they two sides couldn’t reach an agreement on the parameters of a buyout, the Utah Jazz decided to release Bell and pay him the $3.5 million he was owed this year.

After Raja Bell was released, the Utah Jazz fell to 14 players on the roster. The team is likely to sign D-League player Travis Leslie.

Sweeping banking reforms wont protect the public from crisis

Sweeping reforms to Britain’s scandal hit banks will fail to protect the public from another financial crisis, the Government will be warned today.

In an embarrassing rebuke, the influential banking commission of MPs and peers accuses the government of succumbing to powerful lobbying from banks.

It criticises the coalition for trying to ‘railroad ‘ through watered down plans to make the banking system safer, and calls for more hard line powers to break up all lenders’ High Street operations from their ‘casino’ banks if they try to break new rules.
Warning: The banking commission says the Coalition has tried to 'railroad' through weak laws and calls for hardline powers to split High Street lenders from 'casimo' banks if they break rules
Warning: The banking commission says the Coalition has tried to 'railroad' through weak laws and calls for hardline powers to split High Street lenders from 'casimo' banks if they break rules
The government’s arguments for rejecting tougher rules are rejected as ‘insubstantial’.

The banking commission was set up by the Chancellor last summer after Barclays was fined £290 million for manipulating crucial ‘Libor’ interest rates.

Since then both Royal Bank of Scotland and Swiss bank UBS have also received huge fines, with all of the High Street giants forced to set aside millions for mis-selling.


The commission was asked to vet radical reforms of the banking industry. Today (Mon) it publishes its second report, hours before the crucial Banking Reform bill is debated in the House of Commons.

It is likely to make awkward reading for the Chancellor who has previously urged the commission not to ‘tear up’ the consensus on banking reform.

The government has already accepted some of the demands from the commission to beef up reforms which it said in its first report in December were too weak
Worry: The commission, which includes Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, raises concerns that banks will still be able to borrow too much
Worry: The commission, which includes Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, raises concerns that banks will still be able to borrow too much
This includes the need to  ‘electrify’ the ‘ring fence’ insulating lenders’ High Street operations from their investment arms.

This means handing reserve powers to regulators to break up banks completely if they somehow flout the rules – for example by dabbling in speculative bets on the stockmarket within their retail arm.

But today the commission will say  ‘much more work needs to be done’.

The concept of ‘ringfencing’ banks was first put forward by the Independent Commission on Banking, which was set up in the wake of financial crisis and published its final report in September 2011.

The purpose was to ensure that ordinary retail customers would be protected from so called ‘casino’ banking.

By segmenting banks, policymakers hope they will no longer be ‘too big to fail’ and can collapse without causing chaos for customers and needing a bail out from taxpayers.
Informing: Bank of England governor Sir Mervyn King told the commission that bank bosses still have 'surprising access' to both the Chancellor and the Prime Minister
Informing: Bank of England governor Sir Mervyn King told the commission that bank bosses still have 'surprising access' to both the Chancellor and the Prime Minister

But the banking commission believes the government needs to go further. It is adamant that regulators should have the power to break up the entire banking industry in the event of widespread rule breaking.

This would only be carried out on the recommendation of an independent body which should carry out regular reviews of whether the rules are working.

Both proposals have been rejected as a step too far by the government.

The commission, which includes Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, also raises concerns that banks will still be able to borrow too much - risking a repeat of the reckless behaviour that contributed  to the financial crisis.

Northern Rock is a stark example of a bank which relied too heavily on borrowing money on risky wholesale markets,  which it would then lend out to customers.

When the wholesale markets seized up during the credit crunch in 2007, Northern Rock fell to the brink had to be rescued by taxpayers.

The government is criticised for rejecting more robust plans forcing lenders to borrow more conservatively, and falling under the spell of powerful bank lobby groups.

Bank  of England governor Sir Mervyn King told the commission last week that bank bosses still have ‘surprising access’ to both the Chancellor and the Prime Minister, while it was still ‘extraordinarily difficult’ for regulators to get an audience.

Picking up on these comments Andrew Tyrie, chair of the banking commission,suggests the banks ‘have lobbied very successfully in this area.’

The government also comes under fire for rushing through legislation by allowing less time for MPs to make amendments in the next stage of the bill.  

Tyrie says: ‘It is highly regrettable that the Government appears to be compressing the timetable and railroading the bill through the Committee stage.’

He adds: ‘The task of sorting out the banking industry of which this Bill will form a major part, is absolutely essential for the long term health of the British economy. Let’s get it right.’

÷ Former Lloyds boss Eric Daniels will be stripped of 80 per cent of his £1.45million bonus in retribution for the PPI scandal.

Raja Bell released: by the Utah Jazz on sunday

Raja Bell released: by the Utah Jazz on sunday
Raja Bell released: by the Utah Jazz on Sunday
Raja Bell was released by the Utah Jazz, but it comes with a tough lesson for the 36-year-old veteran. CBS Sports reported on March 10 that, while the Jazz released him in time to get picked up by another NBA team, they waited until the point where he can't play in the postseason this year.

The deadline to for playoff eligibility was March 1, but because Utah waited until now, any team that picks him up can use him until the regular season ends, but won't be able to add him to their postseason rosters. It seems like a vindictive move towards a player who has been a disruptive force in Utah.

Bell has clashed with head coach Tyrone Corbin, calling him unprofessional on one occasion. Because of his poor relationship with the organization, Utah has not used him since the last game of the 2011-12 season. Now, it is Utah who got the last laugh. They will pay out the remainder of Bell's $3.4 million contract this season, but he won't find many suitors for his services since he won't be able to help anyone in the postseason.

The Los Angeles Lakers were one team that had interest, but without a postseason hand, the fact that Raja Bell was released so late pretty much ends any interest most teams have in the player.

Vince Neil hospitalized: from Motley Crue Concert

Vince Neil performs in Las Vegas in 2010. The 52-year-old Motley Crue singer was kept overnight at the hospital on Sunday.
Vince Neil performs in Las Vegas in 2010. The 52-year-old Motley Crue singer was kept overnight at the hospital on Sunday.
Motley Crue frontman Vince Neil was rushed to the hospital today (March 10), his bandmates revealed on Twitter.

Neil, 52, fell ill with suspected kidney stones during a performance in Australia and had to be taken to the emergency room to receive care.

Nikki Sixx apologized to fans on the social media site, writing:

Sorry Sydney for a short set tonight but Vince had to be rushed to the hospital for internal pain. Will update you on his progress.


Motley Crue member Mick Mars also took to Twitter to apologize to concert-goers, explaining, "Vince had an attack of kidney stones. He went straight from stage to the hospital."

Motley Crue is currently touring Australia with fellow rockers Kiss and Thin Lizzy. The group was playing a second gig at Sydney's Allphones Arena when Neil started experiencing pain.

Here is what yahoo news reported:

Mötley Crüe were forced to cut short their concert in Sydney on Sunday night when singer Vince Neil was hospitalized for a kidney stone attack.

According to Setlist.fm, the band was nine songs into their set when Nikki Sixx announced that Neil had been in pain throughout the show and needed to be taken to the hospital. Guitarist Mick Mars later apologized for the interruption on Twitter and explained the trouble with his bandmate's kidneys.

The 25 Boldest Career Moves in Rock History: Motley Crue Fire Vince Neil

"He has been having problems for the last few days with kidney stones," the band's manager, Allen Kovac, told CNN. "He was treated at the hospital after the show. It's the middle of the night there, and we will know more later."

Kovac, who called the 52-year-old singer a "warrior," said that the band is still planning to perform as scheduled on Tuesday in Brisbane. "If there is a way to safely perform, [Neil] always does," he said. "In nearly 20 years of managing Motley Crue, I can't recall a show the band has canceled.

Mother-of-two care worker fired for affair with boy of 16 at residential school

Places at the school cost the council up to £200,000 a year.

x-husband was suspicious when teenager sent a romantic birthday card.

It is thought Mrs Callaghan and the teenager are still in a relationship.
 Vicky Callaghan, 33
Under investigation: Vicky Callaghan, 33, is being investigated by police after she allegedly conducted an affair with a boy she had been asked to help as a care worker
A mother of two has lost her job as a care worker after being accused of starting an affair with a troubled teenager.

Vicky Callaghan, 33, is believed to have been assigned the boy at a residential school where she worked to help tackle his ‘attachment issues’.

But she is understood to have been dismissed after allegedly beginning a secret relationship with the 16-year-old, who had been placed there by social workers.

The pair are still thought to be in a relationship, and Mrs Callaghan was last night being investigated by police over whether her behaviour constituted a criminal offence.

Meanwhile her ex-husband, Peter Callaghan, 46, has raised concerns about the impact that spending time with the ‘challenging’ teenager may have on the couple’s children – both aged under five – when they visit their mother.

Mrs Callaghan worked as a mental health practitioner giving one-to-one help to pupils at a school for children with behavioural difficulties.

Teenagers are referred to the school in Greater Manchester with places costing councils up to £200,000 a year per child.

The youth with whom Mrs Callaghan is accused of having a relationship is understood to have been sent to the school after concerns about his family home life.

The council involved in the decision is not in Greater Manchester.

A relative of Mr Callaghan said: ‘Suspicion was first raised last year when he [the teenager] bought her a blouse for her birthday and wrote “To Vicky, lots of love” in the card.’ He claimed the pair were later seen holding hands and Mrs Callaghan started acting like a love-struck teenager.

Mrs Callaghan is understood to have initially denied any relationship, sources have told the Daily Mail, only to be dismissed last summer for abusing her position following an investigation.

According to internal documents, she described what she’d done as ‘the biggest mistake of my life’.

In a letter about the case last November, a council director wrote: ‘It is clear Mrs Callaghan has shown very poor judgement and that she has abused her position of trust and should not be allowed to work with young people in the future.’

‘The biggest mistake of my life’

He went on to write that Mrs Callaghan had been ‘advised’ not to ‘promote contact’ between the teenager and her own children, but that ‘information would suggest that they are in fact having contact’.

Now her ex-husband is demanding the council steps in. ‘Given the sort of teenagers who go to that school, he’s horrified to think that one of them might be helping to look after his kids,’ a relative said.

Mrs Callaghan is now living in a rented two-bedroom house. Asked if she had any comment to make about the alleged relationship, she replied ‘No’ and shut the door.

The teenager – who is said to be doing well at college – arrived at the house a short time later.

The council which originally placed the teenager at the school would not comment.

Asked about Mrs Callaghan’s dismissal, a spokesman for the body which runs the school would only say: ‘That particular member of staff no longer works at the school.’

‘It is clear Mrs Callaghan has abused her position of trust'

Mrs Callaghan is also believed to have been referred to the Disclosure and Barring Service which has power to bar adults from working with children.

Police said they were going to look at whether Mrs Callaghan’s relationship with the teen constituted a criminal offence.

A spokesman said: ‘We have received a complaint alleging an inappropriate relationship between a staff member and a pupil at a school.

‘The force take allegations of this nature extremely seriously and will work with children’s services and other agencies to fully investigate these claims.’

Raja Bell released: Utah Jazz Veteran Guard

Raja Bell is an American professional basketball player
Raja Bell is an American professional basketball player
Raja Bell is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Utah Jazz of the National Basketball Association. He was twice named to the NBA All-Defensive Team.

The Jazz announced Sunday the release of veteran guard Raja Bell, who has not played for the team this season.

Bell, 36, will become an unrestricted free agent once he clears waivers but is ineligible for the playoffs because his release came after a Mar. 1 deadline.

A hard-nosed guard known for his defense and three-point shooting, Bell butted heads with Utah coach Tyrone Corbin last season over his playing time and a perceived lack of communication. Bell did not play much down the stretch last season and did not play at all during the 2012 playoffs.

In May 2012, the Associated Press reported Bell called Corbin “unprofessional” during his exit interview and said he would not play for the Jazz in the future because of “irreparable” damage. He delivered on his threat to take his ball and go home; Bell did not attend training camp and was not with the team this season, with the Jazz mutually agreeing that it was better he stayed away.
Raja Bell playing basketbal
Raja Bell playing basketbal
Bell was on the books for $3.5 million this season, the final year of his contract, and his name came up throughout the summer and into this season as a possible contract buyout candidate or trade piece. Alas, no move came to fruition, and his 2012-13 season goes down as a wasted one, with the Jazz swallowing the entirety of his contract.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports Herb Rudoy, Bell’s agent, expressed his client’s continued desire to play in the NBA. The team most regularly linked to Bell in rumors this season was the Lakers, as Bell was a key member of the “Seven Seconds or Less” Suns coached by Mike D’Antoni and led by point guard Steve Nash, who are now both in L.A. While the Lakers have an open roster spot, Bell’s ineligibility for the playoffs would seem to diminish their short-term interest in him.

Raja Bell is an American professional basketball player
Raja Bell an American professional basketball player
The Jazz are currently in the thick of the race for the No. 8 seed in the Western Conference with a record of 32-31. Yahoo! Sports reported on Friday that Utah, whose roster is now at 14 players, plans to sign Travis Leslie from the D-League.

She got her own guard dog: Mimi the Chihuahua shelters under fellow Crufts

Mimi the Chihuahua was pictured with Scrabble the Leonberger at Crufts.

Scrabble won Pets As Therapy best dog on competition's third day.

Crufts dog show boasts the best of preened pooches of all breeds, colours, shapes - and sizes.

Scrabble the Leonberger and Mimi the Chihuahua demonstrated the impressive variety the competition has to offer, as they were captured together in an adorable photograph.

Tiny Mimi stood between the front legs of sturdy Scrabble on the third day of Crufts, which saw 27,000 dogs fill Birmingham's NEC Arena over the weekend.
Mimi the Chihuahua is dwarfed by Scrabble, the Leonberger, who won Pets as Therapy dog of the year
Mimi the Chihuahua is dwarfed by Scrabble, the Leonberger, who won Pets as Therapy dog of the year
Golden-coated Scrabble stood tall above little Mimi, who pulled off her best puppy dog eyes for the cameras.

Both dogs work as volunteers for the charity Pets As Therapy and Scrabble won the charity's competition for dog of the year.
Puppy poser: American Cocker Spaniel Ricky readying himself for competition in a decorative snood, while his coat is tied up with purple hair clips
Puppy poser: American Cocker Spaniel Ricky readying himself for competition in a decorative snood, while his coat is tied up with purple hair clips


Stand up tall: An excited dog appears to want to be more like a human than any of its fellow competitorsDressing up: One breeder was hoping to catch the judges eye by dressing her pet up in a humourous bib for the world-renowned dog show




Dressed to impress: Owners dressed pets in an array of doggy garments to ensure their pooches stood out

His owner Ann Burrell said: 'He epitomises all that Pets As Therapy stands for. He gives unconditional love to everyone he meets.'

The adorable pair were not the only canines to catch the attention of show-goers over the four-day competition.

A common sight at the show, which attracted 145,000 visitors, was dogs dressed in outfits by their proud owners.

Some wore simple cotton vests and humorous bibs which made them stand out from the crowd.

But American Cocker Spaniel Ricky brought a little sparkle to the arena in a decorative green snood with gold detail, while his coat was tied up with purple hair clips.

Poodle Toy Lincoln was a poser and appeared to give a wink to the camera, while another dog seemed more camera shy and buried its snout in a nearby Ugg boot.

Eye on the prize: Poodle Toy Lincoln sporting a Dusty Springfield-like giving what looks like a wink to the camera Camera shy: The owner of this dog may have thought it was a shoe-in for success at day two of Crufts but found it came over all shy at the 6,000-seater NEC
 One dog seemed to come over camera shy, while Lincoln the white fluffy Poodle appeared to wink for his photo
Dog lovers from 41 countries, from as far afield as Hong Kong, India, Indonesia and Malaysia, took part in the event.

A record 2,131 dogs were registered, with 13 new breeds making their debuts in the breed-judging, gamekeepers' classes and obedience championships.

Crufts was founded in the Victorian era by Charles Cruft - with the inaugural show attracting 2,437 entries to the Royal Agricultural Hall in Islington in 1891.

Cops kill teen gunman: Kid pointed gun at Cop

NYPD shot and killed a 16-year-old gunman after police say he pointed a gun at officers

Teenager was spotted by anti-crime patrol officers in an unmarked police car

Officers saw the teenager fidgeting with his waistband as he walked away from the group of men

When police approached to speak with the young man, cops say he turned on them and aimed a .357 caliber revolver at them
Kimani Gray, 16, was fatally wounded late Saturday evening in Brooklyn after allegedly pointing a handgun at undercover police officers
Kimani Gray, 16, was fatally wounded late Saturday evening in Brooklyn after allegedly pointing a handgun at undercover police officers
A teenager in New York City was shot and killed by undercover police last night after they say he pointed a gun at them.

Kimani Gray, 16, was shot in the leg and stomach when he pulled out a .357 revolver in East Flatbush, Brooklyn

Police say they came across a group of young men on Saturday evening when Gray began walking away from his friends as he saw police arrive.

Officers say the 16-year old began to adjust his waistband and started to act suspiciously.

Gray then turned around and pointed a .357 caliber gun at them. When the two plainclothes officers saw the weapon they responded by opening fire and shot him.

The teen was rushed to Kings County Hospital but later died.

According to witnesses, when the two cops arrived on the scene in an unmarked car, Gray was part of a group of six teenagers standing by the side of the road.

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Shooting: Two plainclothes police officers fatally shot a 16-year-old in Brooklyn last night, after the teen allegedly pulled a loaded gun on them
Shooting: Two plainclothes police officers fatally shot a 16-year-old in Brooklyn last night, after the teen allegedly pulled a loaded gun on them
Investigation: It's not clear how many shots were fired by the officers or whether they had identified themselves as police before the teenager drew a weapon. The police have said the revolver, (red box) was loaded
Investigation: It's not clear how many shots were fired by the officers or whether they had identified themselves as police before the teenager drew a weapon. The police have said the revolver, (red box) was loaded
Brooklyn shooting: NYPD anti-crime patrol officers were in an unmarked car as the teenage gunman he stood with a group of friends outside an East 52nd Street building near Snyder Avenue
Brooklyn shooting: NYPD anti-crime patrol officers were in an unmarked car as the teenage gunman he stood with a group of friends outside an East 52nd Street building near Snyder Avenue
One of Gray's friends, Devonte Brown told the New York post: 'As the cops opened fire, he was screaming, ‘Stop! I’m not running!’

His friends have not explained exactly what caused the police officers to shoot.
Handgun: A .357 revolver - similar to the one police say Kimani Gray, 16, was carrying before they shot him. NYPD have said the gun was loaded with four bullets
Handgun: A .357 revolver - similar to the one police say Kimani Gray, 16, was carrying before they shot him. NYPD have said the gun was loaded with four bullets
Two shots: NYPD say they shot Kimani Gray after he pulled a gun on them. Gray was part of a group of young men police came across on Saturday evening in East Flatbush, Brooklyn
Two shots: NYPD say they shot Kimani Gray after he pulled a gun on them. Gray was part of a group of young men police came across on Saturday evening in East Flatbush, Brooklyn
Police say Gray's gun was loaded with four bullets but have not yet determined whether the teenager fired his weapon.

The teenager had been in trouble with the law before, having been arrested three times since October and had previously been charged with grand larceny and inciting a riot.

6 teens killed in crash: Ohio SUV Crash Identified

Carol Trimble of Warren, a family member of the victims, views the pond along Pine Avenue S.E. in Warren, Ohio where police say six teens were killed in the crash, Sunday, March 10, 2013
Carol Trimble of Warren, a family member of the victims, views the pond along Pine Avenue S.E. in Warren, Ohio where police say six teens were killed in the crash, Sunday, March 10, 2013
WARREN, Ohio — A sport utility vehicle carrying eight teenagers crashed into a guardrail Sunday morning and flipped over into a swampy pond in northeast Ohio, killing six of them while two escaped, the state highway patrol said.

The Honda Passport veered off the left side of a road, hit a guardrail and overturned just south of the city of Warren, about 60 miles east of Cleveland, Lt. Anne Ralston said. Investigators say it came to rest upside down in the swamp and sank with five of the victims trapped inside. A sixth who was thrown from the SUV during the crash was found under it when the vehicle was taken out of the water.

The two survivors escaped and ran to a nearby home to call 911, the highway patrol said.

Ralston didn’t know where the teens were headed when the crash happened at about 7 a.m. She didn’t have any information to release on possible causes of or factors in the crash, but the highway patrol planned a news conference for Sunday night.

“All I know is my baby is gone,” said Derrick Ray, who came to the crash site after viewing his 15-year-old son Daylan’s body at the county morgue. He said he knew that his son, a talented football player who was looking forward to playing in high school, was out with friends, but didn’t know their plans.

A pile of blue, green and copper-red stuffed bears grew at a makeshift memorial at the crash site along a two-lane road tightly bordered with guardrails on either side in an industrial area. The sport utility vehicle had sheared off tall cattails along the guardrail.

There were also notes at the memorial, including a letter from Daylan’s 12-year-old half-sister, Mariah Bryant, who said she had learned they were related only in the past year.
An Ohio State Patrol vehicle sits along Pine Avenue S.E. in Warren, Ohio, where police say six teens were killed in an accident where the vehicle they were traveling in went off the roadway and into a pond, Sunday, March 10, 2013
An Ohio State Patrol vehicle sits along Pine Avenue S.E. in Warren, Ohio, where police say six teens were killed in an accident where the vehicle they were traveling in went off the roadway and into a pond, Sunday, March 10, 2013

“It hurts, it really does, because they are so young and, like, they could have had so much more to life,” she said. “We just really started getting close, and it’s hard to believe he’s gone.”

Two of the teens, both 15, were brought to a hospital in full cardiac arrest, St. Joseph Health Center nursing supervisor Julie Gill said, and were pronounced dead there. She said they were treated for hypothermic drowning trauma, indicating they had been submerged in cold water.

The two who survived, 18-year-old Brian Henry and 15-year-old Asher Lewis, both of Warren, were treated for bruising and other injuries and released, she said.

All those killed were ages 14 to 19, authorities said. State police identified them as 19-year-old Alexis Cayson; Andrique Bennett, 14; Brandon Murray, 17; and Kirkland Behner, Ramone White and Daylan, all 15. The Highway Patrol said Alexis was the only female in the vehicle. It wasn’t clear who was driving.

All eight were from Warren. It’s not believed that any of them were closely related, the highway patrol said.

Near the Pennsylvania state line, Warren is a mostly blue-collar city that was hit by the decline of U.S. steel mills; it has more than 41,000 residents in the industrial Mahoning Valley region.

Swedish princess dies: Princess Lilian dead at 97

Prince Bertil and his companion Lilian Davies smile on Jan. 13, 1976, shortly before their marriage.
STOCKHOLM — The British-born Swedish princess whose secret 33-year romance with her royal husband became Sweden's best-known love story, died on Sunday at the age of 97, the court said.

Princess Lilian was the commoner wife of Prince Bertil, who died in 1997. They met and fell in love in London during World War Two, but had to keep their relationship secret for decades for the sake of the crown and to avoid a constitutional crisis.
"It is with sorrow that I have learnt that H.R.H. (Her Royal Highness) Princess Lilian is dead," Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said in a statement.

"A much loved and appreciated member of the royal family has now passed away," he added.

The royal court said in a statement that the princess, born Lillian Davies to a working class family in Swansea in August 1915, died peacefully in her sleep in the afternoon at her home in Stockholm. Local media said members of the royal family had managed to make their farewells to Lilian before she died.
Princess Lilian of Sweden in August of 2000. The Princess, born Lillian May Davies in Swansea, Wales, in 1915, died on March 10, 2013, at the age of 97.
Lilian, a divorcee, and Prince Bertil had to keep their love secret as Bertil's elder brother and heir to the throne, Prince Gustaf Adolf, had died in a plane crash in 1947 while the next brother, Sigvard, waived his right to the throne by marrying a commoner.

That left Bertil next in line until his infant nephew, Crown Prince Carl Gustaf came of age. If Prince Bertil had married a commoner he would have had to renounce his right to the throne, probably sparking a constitutional crisis.

It was not until after the crown prince became king in 1973, and married a few years later, that Prince Bertil and Lilian could finally get married themselves and appear in public.

The prince also had a house in the south of France and that was where the couple were most relaxed in the times before they could officially become a couple.

After Prince Bertil's death, Lilian carried out many ceremonial duties close to his heart, particularly those linked with sport. She wrote a book about their life together in 2000, including the pain she felt at not being able to accompany her partner on official duties. She dropped out of the public eye after the court said in 2010 that she had Alzheimer's disease.

In a black and white television interview from the time of the wedding, shown on the website of tabloid Aftonbladet, Prince Bertil said the main thing he regretted was that they had to wait so long to get married that they could not have children.

"That is something that is rather sad," he said, before turning to Lilian and adding: "After all, we are still very happy, aren't we?."

"Very, very happy" was Lilian's reply.

Kerry Kennedy says she accidentally took her Ambien before crash

Kennedy, 53, says in a court filing she mistook her sleeping pill for daily thyroid medication

The ex-wife of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants all charges from the July incident dropped

This according to a 99-page motion that includes letters of support from famous friends and family like mother Ethel Kennedy

Kerry Kennedy, daughter of late Robert F. Kennedy, is fighting to get charges against her of driving under the influence dropped by claiming she accidentally took her sleeping medication.
Drugged driving: Kerry Kennedy was charged with driving under the influence in July and now says she accidentally took sleeping medication
Drugged driving: Kerry Kennedy was charged with driving under the influence in July and now says she accidentally took sleeping medication
In New York court filings, Kennedy argued Friday she inadvertently took the drug zolpidem instead of her daily thyroid medication, prior to the July 13 incident.

The filing claims the two bottles 'are virtually identical in size, shape and appearance.'

Kennedy, who was once married to New York governor Andrew Cuomo, crashed her Lexus into a tractor trailer in North Castle, New York this past summer.

Police say the 53-year-old mother of three then fled the scene and was found at an exit ramp.

Kennedy failed a sobriety test and was allegedly slurring her words.

A small amount of the drug, also known as Ambien, was found in Kennedy’s blood.

Letters of support from famous family members and friends, including her mother Ethel Kennedy, were all part of the 99-page motion.

“I have too much regard for the lives of others, as well as my own, to place them at risk by driving under the influence of zolpidem,’ Kennedy wrote in an affidavit.

Also included was a reference to the assassination of Kennedy’s father, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and uncle John F. Kennedy.
Pill mix-up: The daughter of assassinated senator RFK says she meant to take her daily thyroid medication that morning last July
Pill mix-up: The daughter of assassinated senator RFK says she meant to take her daily thyroid medication that morning last July
Kennedy’s lawyers noted their client had ‘experienced more tragedy by the age of 8…than most people experience in a lifetime.’

The filing praised Kennedy’s humanitarian work.

‘By any objective standard,’ wrote defense attorney Gerald Lefcourt ‘Kerry Kennedy is a uniquely remarkable and selfless woman committed to women's rights and social justice.’
Close call: There were no injuries on I-684 (pictured) after Kennedy reportedly hit a tractor trailer, fled, and was found nearby by cops
Close call: There were no injuries on I-684 (pictured) after Kennedy reportedly hit a tractor trailer, fled, and was found nearby by cops
No injuries or damage to other vehicles resulted from the incident.
Prosecutors have until March 26 to respond to the motion to dismiss the case.